in droves

in droves

In large numbers. It was a beautiful day, but the bees were out in droves. People are out in droves at city hall today to protest the mayor's controversial plan.
See also: drove
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

in droves

Fig. in large numbers. (See also be out in droves.) The settlers arrived on the prairie in droves.
See also: drove
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
See also:
References in periodicals archive ?
The late-night talk show host who would cut Scousers off in droves - and was once voted the rudest man in radio.
"Prospective renters have responded in droves, realizing the uniqueness of the views from every apartment; amenities found typically in condominiums, including the full-service hotel-style concierge; and accessible location."
We are constantly told of a shortage of police, yet at any big function (pop concerts, football etc) they come out in droves. When it's over they vanish into the air.
The day after the attack, security forces were out in droves in the city.
Southern audiences came out in droves to see the black female lawyer who represented Martin Luther King Jr.
The rest got theirs through "controlled circulation," a laughable euphemism for "for free." By 2001, those who were paying were declining to renew "in droves," as even Ledbetter puts it.
Dinkins won more than 90 per cent of the black vote, but Democratic whites deserted him in droves. Giuliani also capitalized on the crime issue, itself highly charged with racist overtones.