in dire straits

in dire straits

In a very bleak or grim situation. The recent nosedive in the stock market has left many companies in dire straits. I was in dire straits there for a while, but I'm feeling much better after my hospital stay.
See also: dire, strait

in dire straits

Fig. in a very serious, bad circumstance. We are nearly broke and need money for medicine. We are in dire straits.
See also: dire, strait

dire straits, in

In an awful situation, terrible circumstances. The adjective “dire,” which dates from the mid-1500s, is rarely heard today except in this cliché and one other phrase, dire necessity, which uses it more or less hyperbolically (as, for example, in Elizabeth Barrett Browning’s 1836 letter, “The dire necessity of having every window in the house open . . .”). In contrast, the cliché describes a genuine difficulty or danger, as in “The stock-market crash left him in dire straits financially.” Also the name of a British rock band active from 1977 to 1995.
See also: dire
References in classic literature ?
Trent, who had seen men before in dire straits, fed him from a spoon and forced brandy between his lips.
And if we are able thus to attack an inferior force with a superior one, our opponents will be in dire straits.
He was 68.Nicknamed Munna Lahori, Rehman was in dire straits for quite some time due to a lack of work and deteriorating health.
Bulgaria also tops the ranking in terms of the share of people who live in dire straits with 34.2%, followed by Romania (22.7%) and Greece (22.2%).
But then, the global economy is also in dire straits which politicians have constantly assured us, is set to turn yet another corner.
Giving evidence the musician said: "I was trying to protect my finances as best I could on behalf of my son because I recognised I was in dire straits."
We ran down to the river and continued for about 12 miles.'' The core of The Straits is Alan, who was in Dire Straits from 1980 to 1992, guitarist Phil Palmer, who joined in 1991, and saxophonist Chris White who joined Dire Straits in 1985.
He says Allardyce, pictured, took over Newcastle when it was in dire straits, correct.
"The victims are in dire straits: Medically in dire straits-- in terms of water and food in dire straits.
There are people of our own living in dire straits finding great difficulty in making ends meet.
GLANTRAETH never hinted at emulating their Welsh Cup 6-1 special in the league re-match and, indeed, they looked in dire straits when two goals down until the final 15 minutes of the match.
This was a time when Britain's economy was in dire straits after the war.
Alan Greene, chairman of the South West Wales Road Hauliers' Association which took part in the Pembroke protest, said: 'We are here to show that we are still alive and kicking and that the haulage industry is in dire straits at the moment.'
There is no doubt the sturgeon, an ancient fish that can live up to 100 years and weigh more than a ton, is in dire straits. Years of over-fishing have depleted the population.
If it all goes wrong, you are in dire straits. It is not the end of the club, but they are in dire straits financially.