in a nutshell

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in a nutshell

In summary; concisely. In a nutshell, the app helps you to plan parties. I don't want the long version—just tell me what your thesis is in a nutshell.
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put it in a nutshell

To summarize or describe something in only a few words. To put it in a nutshell, the servers are crashing because of an issue with our power supply. Let me put it in a nutshell for you—if you show up late again, you're fired!
See also: nutshell, put
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

in a nut shell

Fig. [of news or information] in a (figurative) capsule; in summary. This cable channel provides the latest news in a nut shell. In a nut shell, what happened at work today?
See also: nut, shell
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

in a nutshell

Concisely, in a few words, as in Here's our proposal-in a nutshell, we want to sell the business to you. This hyperbolic expression alludes to the Roman writer Pliny's description of Homer's Iliad being copied in so tiny a hand that it could fit in a nutshell. For a time it referred to anything compressed, but from the 1500s on it referred mainly to written or spoken words.
See also: nutshell
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

in a nutshell

COMMON You say in a nutshell when you are describing something very briefly. She wants me to leave the company. I want to stay. That's it in a nutshell. I don't know what I'm doing and I guess that's the problem in a nutshell.
See also: nutshell
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

in a nutshell

in the fewest possible words.
A nutshell is a traditional metaphor for a very small space. It is used by Shakespeare in Hamlet: ‘I could be bounded in a nutshell, and count myself a king of infinite space, were it not that I have bad dreams’.
See also: nutshell
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

(put something) in a ˈnutshell

(informal) (say or express something) in a very clear way, using few words: Unemployment is rising, prices are increasing; in a nutshell, the economy is in trouble.‘Do you like his idea?’ ‘To put it in a nutshell, no.’
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Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

in a nutshell

In a few words; concisely: Just give me the facts in a nutshell.
See also: nutshell
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

in a nutshell

Concisely or compactly, usually referring to written or spoken words. The Roman writer Pliny in his Natural History stated that Homer’s great (and very long) epic poem, the Iliad, was copied in such tiny handwriting that the whole text could be enclosed in a nutshell. This obvious hyperbole caught the imagination of numerous subsequent writers who referred to “the Iliad in a nutshell,” among them Jonathan Swift and Thomas Carlyle. Later “the Iliad” was dropped and anything extremely compressed was described as being in a nutshell, a cliché since the mid-nineteenth century. See also in a word.
See also: nutshell
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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