in a huff


Also found in: Legal.

in a huff

In an angry, belligerent, or vexed manner. Don't go off in a huff like that, it was only a joke! Mary went off in a huff after her wife criticized her cooking.
See also: huff

*in a huff

Fig. in an angry or offended manner. (*Typically: be ~; get [into] ~.) He heard what we had to say, then left in a huff. She came in a huff and ordered us to bring her something to eat.
See also: huff

in a huff

In an offended manner, angrily, as in When he left out her name, she stalked out in a huff. This idiom transfers huff in the sense of a gust of wind to a burst of anger. [Late 1600s] Also see in a snit.
See also: huff

in a huff

INFORMAL
COMMON If someone is in a huff, they are angry about something. He stormed off in a huff because he didn't win. He resigned from the firm in a huff when he didn't get promoted.
See also: huff

in a ˈhuff

(informal) in a bad mood, especially because somebody has annoyed or upset you: She went off in a huff.
See also: huff
References in classic literature ?
But Robin would not give way to his lieutenant, and that is why John, in a huff, had gone with Will to Barnesdale.
And Jo went off in a huff at the doubts expressed of her powers.
So, on the whole, we were not sorry when honest Greatheart went off to the Celestial City in a huff and left us at liberty to choose a more suitable and accommodating man.
What I would say about him is that he doesn't go in a huff with you if you've had a disagreement during a game.
I wish a few more were like that because some players go in a huff, not only for the rest of the game, but for weeks.
All of 25, he was beckoned away, well, in a huff, to Sonoma with thousands of dollars in his pocket after receiving a call from an antique dealer who had procured the reel from a Grey descendant.