in a hole

in a hole

slang In a disadvantageous position. Primarily heard in UK, Australia. I'm in a hole here, trying to fix my car on the side of the road with no clue what to do! I've been in a hole with some of my friends ever since they heard that I started a rumor about them.
See also: hole

in a hole

mainly BRITISH, INFORMAL
If you are in a hole, you are in a difficult or embarrassing situation. Whenever Frank was in a hole, he'd call me and ask for help. They definitely left me in a hole when they couldn't honour their contract. Note: If someone or something gets you out of a hole, they get you out of a difficult or embarrassing situation. He was the player you relied on to get the team out of a hole when it mattered. Many companies are hoping for a stock market increase to get them out of a hole.
See also: hole

in a hole

in an awkward situation from which it is difficult to escape. informal
This figurative use of hole has been in use since the mid 18th century (compare with dig yourself into a hole at dig). The English politician Denis Healey described the first law of politics as ‘when you are in a hole, stop digging’.
See also: hole

in a ˈhole

(informal) in a difficult situation: He had got himself into a hole and it was going to be difficult to get out of it.
See also: hole
References in periodicals archive ?
Suppose at some stage in a hole it becomes clear to pair A that pair B will not be able to get a birdie, but that they will have a par with probability p (assumed given or estimable) and a bogie with probability q (p + q = 1).
Though it's perhaps hard to imagine this pale wood being so evocative or seductive, the piece does tempt you to stick your fingers in a hole or two.
"We've said a burrowing animal is one that digs for shelter or habitation rather than for recreational reasons so if someone's ball lands in a hole dug by a dog for example they'll just have to accept it as bad fortune."