impact

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Related to impacting: belittled, confine, epitomize

have an impact on (someone or something)

To affect or influence someone or something. Of course your decision has an impact on me—I'm your wife! Don't worry, your grade on that assignment has very little impact upon your overall grade for the semester.
See also: have, impact, on

impact (up)on (someone or something)

To affect or influence someone or something. Of course your decision impacts on me—I'm your wife! Don't worry, your grade on that assignment won't impact upon your overall grade for the semester.
See also: impact

upon impact

At the instant physical contact or a collision occurred. The egg smashed upon impact with the cement. No, sir, the pilot died upon impact.
See also: impact, upon

have an impact on someone or something

to leave an impression on someone or something. The sharp change in interest rates had an impact on the housing market. Your story really had an impact on me.
See also: have, impact, on

impact (up)on someone or something

[for something] to have an effect on someone or something. (Upon is formal and less commonly used than on.) This plant closing will impact upon the local economy for years to come. The day's troubles impacted on Rachel quite seriously.
See also: impact, on

upon impact

Fig. at the place or time of an impact. The car crumpled upon impact with the brick wall. The man who fell from the top of the building died on impact.
See also: impact, upon

impact on

v.
To have an effect on someone or something: The results of the election will impact on upcoming legislation.
See also: impact, on
References in periodicals archive ?
Scientific interest in the process of impacting has surged in recent years as researchers accumulate evidence of life-disrupting blows at the K-T boundary and other major turning points in geologic time.
Another option that was pursued in this project was to place a layer of low modulus polymer between the impacting force and the foam.
The two hammer setup consists of an impacting hammer (12 lbs) and a receiving hammer (12 lbs) - with the sample to be tested attached to the face of the receiving hammer during the uniaxial compression test (12 lb = 5.433 kg).
The impacting hammer was raised to a certain height and released, resulting in an impact with the sample sandwiched between the hammers.
"The Galileo light curves all look alike, which suggests that the impacting objects were all qualitatively similar," says Kevin Zahnle of NASA's Ames Research Center in Mountain View, Calif.
"Impervious surfaces are impacting the lakes and streams on a number of fronts," he says.