immemorial

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time immemorial

Long before one would be able to remember; the distant past. Our family line has presided over this land since time immemorial. Giant sea turtles have been coming to this spot to mate since time immemorial.
See also: immemorial, time

from time immemorial

A time long before one would be able to remember; since the distant past. Our family line has presided over this land from time immemorial. Giant sea turtles have been coming to this spot to mate from time immemorial.
See also: immemorial, time

since time immemorial

since a very long time ago. (Literally, since time before recorded history.) My hometown has had a big parade on the Fourth of July since time immemorial. since time immemorial, the trees have blossomed each spring.
See also: immemorial, since, time

time immemorial

Also, time out of mind. Long ago, beyond memory or recall, as in These ruins have stood here since time immemorial, or His office has been on Madison Avenue for time out of mind. The first expression comes from English law, where it signifies "beyond legal memory," specifically before the reign of Richard I (1189-1199), fixed as the legal limit for bringing certain kinds of lawsuit. By about 1600 it was broadened to its present sense of "a very long time ago." The variant, first recorded in 1432, uses mind in the sense of "memory" or "recall."
See also: immemorial, time

since time immemorial

or

from time immemorial

LITERARY
If you say that something has been happening since time immemorial or from time immemorial, you mean that it has been happening for many centuries. Thailand's central position in Southeast Asia has had a major effect on the art of the area since time immemorial. From time immemorial, we have danced to celebrate the sacred forces of Nature.
See also: immemorial, since, time

time immemorial

used to refer to a point of time so long ago that people have no knowledge or memory of it.
In legal terms in Britain, time immemorial refers to the time up to the beginning of the reign of Richard I in 1189 . A variant of the phrase is time out of mind .
See also: immemorial, time

from/since ˌtime immeˈmorial

from ancient times; from a very long time ago: The Barton family have lived in this village since time immemorial.
See also: immemorial, since, time
References in periodicals archive ?
It may well be (and this is my thesis) that number itself does not pass, that it is immemorially deployed in a swarming coextensive to its being.
Only by understanding the nature of traditional architecture, honed immemorially by humankind's relationship to nature, can we begin to make sustainable buildings.
Committee for Industrial Organization, (134) Justice Roberts noted that "wherever the title of streets and parks may rest, they have immemorially been held in trust for the use of the public and time out of mind, have been used for purposes of assembly, communicating thoughts between citizens, and discussing public questions.
The serpent has immemorially served as a symbol of the eternal renewal of life in many societies through its annual renew al of its skin.
Humans have been killing and eating other animals for an immemorially long time, and the opponents of this practice have had the same expanse in which to work out their critique.
It is clear that unlike public streets and parks, Web pages on the Internet have not by long tradition or government flat been devoted to assembly and debate; nor has the City's Web page immemorially been held in trust for use by the public," wrote the judge.
In this dialogue, Baker argues, Spenser's spokesman Irenius reveals the challenge that brehon law in Ireland represents not only to the administration of English common law but to the assumption that it is authorized immemorially by custom, without the intrusion of alien law.
Elsewhere she wrote, "The immemorially observed constituents of the Plough preserve no fixed order of relative brilliancy, now one, now another of the septet having at sundry epochs assumed the primacy.
Tyrannical governments," he wrote in a 1960 law review essay, "had immemorially utilized dictatorial criminal procedure and punishment to make scapegoats of the weak, or of helpless political, religious, or racial minorities and those who differed, who would not conform and who resisted tyranny" (p.
Moved to sing by death's approach, swans have been identified with poets immemorially, but Wordsworth accentuates the traditional association.
Kelsall argues that the twentieth-century novels continue and even intensify the tradition of glorifying the great house, but his own remarkable rhetoric suggests he believes in the essential rightness of this position: "These historical links are there in the English house as intrinsically as the motions of the blood in the body retain immemorially the flux of the primeval oceans responsive to the phases of the moon" (p.
That earthly magic immemorially believed to protect a king is symbolized in the "Horatian Ode" by the imperial laurel supposed to be proof against lightning, but now incapable of saving Charles.
The killer's "fascinated look carries within it the phallus immemorially attributed to the mother," Bellour writes, "But he can acknowledge it in himself only on condition that he ceaselessly encounter it in his mirror-image, namely in the body/look of woman (which engenders the mirage), and as an absolute threat to which he must respond; otherwise, it is his own body that will desert him" (1979, 120).
Even so precociously industrial an area as Lancashire has its variety of economies, side by side and interspersed, complementary and competitive, immemorially old and painfully new.