immemorial


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Related to immemorial: since time immemorial

time immemorial

Long before one would be able to remember; the distant past. Our family line has presided over this land since time immemorial. Giant sea turtles have been coming to this spot to mate since time immemorial.
See also: immemorial, time

from time immemorial

A time long before one would be able to remember; since the distant past. Our family line has presided over this land from time immemorial. Giant sea turtles have been coming to this spot to mate from time immemorial.
See also: immemorial, time

since time immemorial

since a very long time ago. (Literally, since time before recorded history.) My hometown has had a big parade on the Fourth of July since time immemorial. since time immemorial, the trees have blossomed each spring.
See also: immemorial, since, time

time immemorial

Also, time out of mind. Long ago, beyond memory or recall, as in These ruins have stood here since time immemorial, or His office has been on Madison Avenue for time out of mind. The first expression comes from English law, where it signifies "beyond legal memory," specifically before the reign of Richard I (1189-1199), fixed as the legal limit for bringing certain kinds of lawsuit. By about 1600 it was broadened to its present sense of "a very long time ago." The variant, first recorded in 1432, uses mind in the sense of "memory" or "recall."
See also: immemorial, time

since time immemorial

or

from time immemorial

LITERARY
If you say that something has been happening since time immemorial or from time immemorial, you mean that it has been happening for many centuries. Thailand's central position in Southeast Asia has had a major effect on the art of the area since time immemorial. From time immemorial, we have danced to celebrate the sacred forces of Nature.
See also: immemorial, since, time

time immemorial

used to refer to a point of time so long ago that people have no knowledge or memory of it.
In legal terms in Britain, time immemorial refers to the time up to the beginning of the reign of Richard I in 1189 . A variant of the phrase is time out of mind .
See also: immemorial, time

from/since ˌtime immeˈmorial

from ancient times; from a very long time ago: The Barton family have lived in this village since time immemorial.
See also: immemorial, since, time
References in periodicals archive ?
Since Time Immemorial delves into tribal sovereignty and the challenges of self-governing as well as current Native American concerns, such as the achievement gap.
Humanity has practiced slavery in various forms since time immemorial.
What it used to be, from time immemorial, was a lively, bustling Market town but no more.
23 (ANI): President Pratibha Devisingh Patil on Tuesday asked expatriate Indian students to learn from the experiences of Mahatma Gandhi, and added that the quest for knowledge has been a basic characteristic of Indian ethos from time immemorial.
He said: "The climate's been changing since time immemorial.
Kyrgyz and Uzbeks always lived in peace and accord since time immemorial.
With critical habitat designation and a recovery plan, jaguars will have a chance to roam once again through the southwestern lands they've inhabited since time immemorial," Robinson added.
As encroaching development destroys the environment in which the indigenous peoples of Malaysia have lived since time immemorial, they are often treated, in the dreadful term used in modern warfare, as 'collateral damage' (Borneo's changing heart, February 2010).
It has been part of Mediterranean and Spanish culture for time immemorial.
The British establishment has inculcated into the mindset of the majority of its citizens since time immemorial that coalition government won't work and will be detrimental to this country.
Glasgow has moved to cement its status as a regional curry capital and is chasing official recognition as home of the tikka masala since time immemorial.
From time immemorial this feast has been celebrated on September 8th, a matter on which both the Roman Missal and the Anglican Book of Common Prayer are at one.
From time immemorial, we have creatively used all modes of artistic expression to articulate the myriad aspects of our human condition and experience.
Add to all this the custom of the Church, from time immemorial, of offering Masses for the deceased and "for the souls of the faithful departed" and we cannot but conclude that the doctrine of the existence of Purgatory is an article of Faith.
The Greeks have done everything first and better than anyone else since time immemorial and, for the most part, it's true.