immediate

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immediate occupancy

Describing a residence that can be inhabited immediately. We have to move out of our current place next week, so we need something for immediate occupancy.
See also: immediate

with immediate effect

Beginning right now. With immediate effect, employees will no longer be able to take company computers home without the written permission of a supervisor.
See also: effect, immediate

immediate occupancy

[of an apartment or house] ready to be moved into at this moment. This house is for immediate occupancy. You can move in today if you want. The apartment is empty, so that means immediate occupancy.
See also: immediate
References in periodicals archive ?
It may seem that this last part is initiated by the interviewer's 'Uhm,' but notice the immediateness of the transfer from the word 'query' to 'you.' It is therefore more likely that the clarification is motivated by the student's own need to sum up rather than an invitation from the teacher.
From January 1, 1959, the extraliterary substance, then considered nurturing and vital for his new life and poetry, constituted the immediateness of his daily existence, especially within the collective enthusiasm of the first years of the Cuban political process: namely, "the calm reaffirmation of [his] personal experience in light of the dynamic and reliable historical process that the Revolution signifie[d]" (Ellis 1220).
Likewise, he undoes the physical immediateness of the deictic here/now (Here ...
Although Patton stresses specificity and immediateness, his analysis shows the interconnections among labor, the trade unions, and political parties.
858, 858 (1965) ("[T]he launching of Sputnik I precipitated us into the outer space with immediateness and something of a state of shock.
Metaphor and simile are worse than useless if they do not seem to be the natural, spontaneous impression that has sprung to the poet's mind, and do not, as handed on by him, carry that impression to his readers with the immediateness and certainty of a revealing light.
Furthermore, Hecker, Chesney, Black, and Frautschi (1988) presented the evidence that hostility, immediateness, and competitiveness were related to coronary heart disease.
The death of a parent, child, sibling, or spouse are the most significant relationships by which the immediateness of bereavement is defined.
The sense of immediateness that leads us to invest enormous resources to rescue a child trapped in a well, without regard to utility calculations or the relative wellbeing of others who could benefit from our attention, also calls for the slice-of-time perspective in allocating certain care to both the terminally ill and the elderly.
Following Condorcet, Urbinati argues that, by magnifying the often hasty and ill-conceived decisions of the electorate, the immediateness of direct democracy makes it inherently unstable.
Lukacs calls `the philosophy of life', mentioning especially those writers between 1800 and 1900 who theorized the immediateness of life as the access route to `true reality', parting company with the methods of analytical thought and the causal logic that directs the scientific approach.