imagination

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beyond imagination

Inconceivable; outside of the realm of imagination, expectation, or anticipation. I find it simply beyond imagination the greed of all these big corporations. That film was amazing, it was actually beyond imagination.
See also: beyond, imagination

leave nothing to the imagination

1. Of clothing, to hide or cover very little (of the body) or be very revealing. I was quite embarrassed when John showed up for our date wearing ill-fitting jeans that left nothing to the imagination.
2. To present (something) in a very stark or obvious manner. The film is relentlessly blunt with its anti-religious message, leaving nothing to the imagination from beginning to end.

leave little to the imagination

1. Of clothing, to hide or cover very little (of the body) or be very revealing. I was quite embarrassed when John showed up for our date wearing ill-fitting jeans that left little to the imagination.
2. To present (something) in a very stark or obvious manner. The film is relentlessly blunt with its anti-religious message, leaving little to the imagination from beginning to end.

by no stretch of the imagination

Unable to happen within, at, or beyond the limits of the imagination; in no possible situation or from no conceivable perspective. By no stretch of the imagination do I think our team has a chance of winning tonight. Tommy does all right in school, but by no stretch of the imagination would I call him a genius.
See also: by, imagination, no, of, stretch

figment of (one's)/the imagination

An experience that initially is thought to be real but is actually imagined. I thought I heard the sound of my front door opening last night but it turned out to be a figment of my imagination.
See also: figment, imagination, of

flight of imagination

An imaginative but unrealistic idea. No one took his campaign for office seriously because his proposed solutions to problems were filled with flights of imagination.
See also: flight, imagination, of

be a figment of (one's/the) imagination

To be an imagined experience (especially after one has initially thought it to be real). I thought I heard the sound of my front door opening last night but it turned out to be a figment of my imagination.
See also: figment, imagination, of

by any stretch of the imagination

As much or as far as one is able to imagine or believe. Usually used in the negative. It's looking like we're not going to win by any stretch of the imagination. I can't see by any stretch of the imagination how we're going to pull this off.
See also: any, by, imagination, of, stretch

capture (one's) imagination

To hold one's interest or spark one's creativity. I know it sounds strange, but his talk on the importance of obtuse angles really captured my imagination. That movie captured his imagination so much that it inspired him to become a screenwriter.
See also: capture, imagination

not by any stretch of the imagination

Unable to happen within, at, or beyond the limits of the imagination; in no possible situation or from no conceivable perspective. I don't think our team has a chance of winning tonight by any stretch of the imagination. Tommy does all right in school, but not by any stretch of the imagination would I call him a genius.
See also: any, by, imagination, not, of, stretch

by any stretch of the imagination

as much as anyone could imagine; as much as is imaginable. (Often negative.) I don't see how anyone by any stretch of the imagination could fail to understand what my last sentence meant.
See also: any, by, imagination, of, stretch

capture someone's imagination

Fig. to intrigue someone; to interest someone in a lasting way; to stimulate someone's imagination. The story of the young wizard has captured the imagination of the world's children.
See also: capture, imagination

figment of one's imagination

Something made up, invented, or fabricated, as in "The long dishevelled hair, the swelled black face, the exaggerated stature were figments of imagination" (Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre, 1847). This term is redundant, since figment means "product of the imagination." [Early 1800s]
See also: figment, imagination, of

not by any stretch of the imagination

or

by no stretch of the imagination

If you say that something is not true or possible by any stretch of the imagination or by no stretch of the imagination, you mean that it is completely untrue or impossible. He had several jobs, all of them involving driving but none of them well-paid by any stretch of the imagination. By no stretch of the imagination could his speech be described as impersonal.
See also: any, by, imagination, not, of, stretch

by any stretch of the imagination

If something is not true by any stretch of the imagination, it is definitely not true. The Danube was not by any stretch of the imagination blue. Note: People sometimes just say by any stretch. He is not regarded as a serious biographer by any stretch.
See also: any, by, imagination, of, stretch

by no (or not by any) stretch of the imagination

used to emphasize that something is definitely not the case.
1996 New Statesman Though it is by no stretch of the imagination a political paper, its owner has a reputation as an outspoken critic of China.
See also: by, imagination, no, of, stretch

a figment of somebody’s imagiˈnation

something which somebody only imagines: Doctor, are you suggesting the pain is a figment of my imagination?
See also: figment, imagination, of

by ˈno stretch of the imagination

,

not by ˈany stretch of the imagination

it is completely impossible to say; by no means: By no stretch of the imagination could you call him clever.You couldn’t say that factory was beautiful, not by any stretch of the imagination!
See also: by, imagination, no, of, stretch
References in periodicals archive ?
The imaginational overexcitability and emotional overexcitability were significantly related to insomnia.
The imaginational overexcitability was significantly related to fear of the unknown.
The sensual, intellectual, and particularly the imaginational overexcitabilities were also higher among gifted students.
In this study, gifted students had significantly higher levels of intellectual and imaginational overexcitabilities than the regular students, which confirms previous studies (Ackerman & Paulus, 1997; Bouchet & Falk, 2001; Falk & Miller, 2009; Miller et al.
Perhaps imaginational overexcitability, fear of the unknown, and intellectual overexcitability jointly produce anxiety about the deepest questions of life.
Because the imaginational overexcitability seems to be one of the most prominent overexcitabilities among gifted individuals, then guiding and helping students to take advantage of the positive aspects of the imaginational overexcitability may also be helpful in reducing anxiety among gifted students.
Dungeons & Dragons could be used as an effective tool and strategy when dealing with a gifted individual with a strong imaginational overexcitability that needs to be sated.
Qualitative analyses of the focus-group data provided most support for psychological intensities in the realms of intellectual and emotional intensities; some support was found for imaginational and sensual intensities.
Miller, Silverman, and Falk (1994), in a comparative study, hypothesized that intellectually gifted adults' measured OEs and level of development would be higher than OEs of a group of graduate students; that there would be no gender differences; and that developmental potential as measured by OEs--specifically intellectual, imaginational, and emotional--would predict level of development.
Falk, Manzanero, and Miller (1997) conducted a cross-cultural study attempting to add further validity to previous findings that artists exhibit high intellectual, imaginational, and, emotional OEs.
Findings indicated that all five children manifested behaviors Tucker and Hafenstein associated with intellectual, imaginational, and emotional OEs.
Bouchet and Falk (2001) tested two hypotheses: (1) university students who attended gifted education programs have greater emotional, intellectual, and imaginational OEs than those who did not, and (2) gender differences exist in OE scores, such that women score higher on emotional and sensual and men score higher on intellectual and psychomotor OEs.
The greatest support for the claim that gifted persons manifest the profile of elevated imaginational, intellectual, and emotional OEs--the Big Three--with depressed sensual and psychomotor OEs is found in the studies with adult participants.
1997) study manifested the elevated scores on emotional, intellectual, and imaginational OEs.