illuminate

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illuminate

To clarify or further explain something. I think the author's scathing description of the ball gowns really illuminates his view of upper-class life. Thank you for illuminating that point for me.

illuminate (something) with (something)

1. Literally, to use something to light up a particular place or area. Sam wants to illuminate the whole room with candles before he proposes to Jen.
2. By extension, to use something to clarify or explain something else. I think the author really illuminates his view of upper-class life with his scathing description of the ball gowns.
3. To adorn or embellish something, usually a text, with things like colors and designs. The author had illuminated the text with accents in gold leaf.
See also: illuminate

illuminate something with something

 
1. Lit. to light up something with something. The lights illuminated the monument with a bright glow. The monument was illuminated with mercury vapor lamps.
2. Fig. to clarify or elucidate something with explanation. Please try to illuminate this matter with an explanation. Could you illuminate your answer with a little more detail?
3. to decorate a manuscript with pictures or designs, as done in medieval monasteries. The monks spent all their days illuminating manuscripts with pictures. No one has the patience to illuminate books with tiny designs.
See also: illuminate

illuminated

mod. alcohol intoxicated. (A play on lit.) Paul is a bit illuminated.
See also: illuminate
References in periodicals archive ?
Another point made illuminatingly in the story is the power of manipulation offered by language, which is represented both by Hermann and Falk.
It would be hard, I believe, for him to explain illuminatingly pictorial composition and the role of color in painting (except, of course, insofar as he could cite and critique the commentaries of his sighted colleagues).
They need to be preserved and cherished in all their richness profound or punning or philosophical, obvious occasionally and more often than not, illuminatingly obscure.
May and other philosophers have written illuminatingly about global justice, but their proposals for institutional reform frequently come across as naive.
But it was so good last Sunday to hear a tiny BCMG (just two duos) perform music by two of the greats of the recent past, Stockhausen and Berio, and so charmingly and illuminatingly introduced by artist-in-association John Woolrich.
You need a technical grasp of the subject to write illuminatingly about it even without the aid of technical jargon, and most comparatists lack, or feel they lack, that competence.
Illuminatingly, US magazine Entertainment Weekly, on first sight of this show, commented: "The unintended message he delivered was one from West Coast America: 'Don't take our cheeseburgers away from us, you pushy Brit'."
Barnard blends these disparate elements flawlessly, and each converses illuminatingly with the others.
In his 1982 interview with John Haffenden, Geoffrey Hill illuminatingly declared:
A developmental narrative is inevitable here, bur for the most part the volume manages to avoid simply reducing the short stories to incipient versions of the later work, even while frequently (and illuminatingly) featuring the short fiction as anticipating individual novels or particular modes of writing.
But before I embark on discussion of these conditions, it is important first to establish both an understanding of republicanism, especially legal republicanism, and an understanding of why Justice Rand's decision in Roncarelli is quintessentially and illuminatingly republican.
"The last time I saw him he was covered in thick mud, having just fallen into an irrigation ditch, but he gave me a beaming smile and, in the manner that only he could deliver, illuminatingly described his misfortune to all."
Analyzing Part IV, she illuminatingly explains that, pace Seznec, the episode functions hOt to present a mere parade of heresies, but to depict "the dazzle of gnosis," and is strongly influenced by the recently discovered pistis Sophia scrolls, similar to the Gnostic Dead Sea Scrolls, but reaching Europe a century earlier.
Patrick Provost-Smith illuminatingly demonstrates that the Constantinian package was at the heart of debates among Catholic missionaries to China in the 1580s.
Nor can anyone describe more faithfully or illuminatingly not only the faults in rhyming and other poetic devices of Lawrence's juvenilia, but also the ways Lawrence successfully revised individual poems like the famous "Piano" and "Bavarian Gentians" (in Chapters 5 and 6) and the slow "genesis" of "Snake" (Chapter 4).