like it or lump it

(redirected from if you don't like it you can lump it)

like it or lump it

Whether you like it or not, as of a situation that one cannot change. Well, like it or lump it, this old, falling-down hotel is the only one with rooms available this weekend.
See also: like, lump

Like it or lump it!

Inf. There is no other choice. Take that or none. John: I don't like this room. It's too small. Bill: Like it or lump it. That's all we've got. Jane: I don't want to be talked to like that. Sue: Well, like it or lump it! That's the way we talk around here.
See also: like, lump

like it or lump it

Also, if you don't like it you can lump it. Whether or not you want to, as in Like it or lump it, we're staying home this summer. The origin of lump in this idiom is unclear; one writer believes it to be a euphemism for stuff it, a not unreasonable conjecture. [Early 1800s]
See also: like, lump

like it or lump it

mainly BRITISH, INFORMAL
People say like it or lump it to mean that you have to accept a situation even if you do not like it. This is the way our system works: like it or lump it. If you're a shareholder in the club then you can influence way things are run. But as a paying customer you like it or lump it. Note: You can also say that someone will have to lump it when they have to accept a situation whether they want to or not. When we pointed out they'd taken part of our garden, they said they hadn't even noticed. We just had to lump it.
See also: like, lump

Like it or lump it!

exclam. Give up!; Shut up!; Accept it or go away! (see also Lump it!.) If you don’t want to do it my way, like it or lump it!
See also: like, lump

like it or lump it

Put up with it, whether or not you like it. An Americanism dating from the early nineteenth century, John Neal used it in The Down-Easters (1833). It was quoted by Dickens (“If you don’t like it, it’s open to you to lump it,” Our Mutual Friend, 1864) and by numerous later writers. The precise source of lump has been lost. One authority suggests it comes from a British dialect word meaning to look sullen; another believes it is a polite version of “stuff it (up your behind).”
See also: like, lump
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