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(I'd be) happy to (do something)

Glad or eager to do something. Sure, I'd be happy to help! What do you need? Always happy to help.
See also: happy

I could tell you, but then I'd have to kill you

humorous If I told you this extremely confidential or sensitive piece of information, I'd have to kill you to ensure that you don't share it with anyone else. Sure, I know who really stole the test answers, and I could tell you—but then I’d have to kill you. A: "I could tell you, but then I’d have to kill you." B: "Well then, I guess I'll never know the big secret, huh?"
See also: but, could, have, kill, tell

I wish I'd said that

An expression usually of admiration for another's cleverness or disappointment that one didn't say such a thing oneself. Oh man, that's a great comeback—I wish I'd said that! I wish I'd said that, but no, I stammered like an idiot instead.
See also: said, that, wish

I'd like you to meet (someone)

A phrase used when introducing two people. Hey, come here—I'd like you to meet my co-worker Janet. Elizabeth, I'd like you to meet my mom.
See also: like, meet

I'd (just) as soon (do something)

I would like to or would rather do something. Often used when one is faced with several options. It would be nice to live somewhere else, but I would just as soon go to a local college, so that I can stay close to my family. I'd just as soon stay home tonight—is that all right?
See also: soon

I'd bet money (on something)

I'm so confident that I am right (or that you are wrong) that I'm willing to bet on it. Oh, with your GPA, you're definitely going to be named valedictorian—I'd bet money on it.
See also: bet, money

I'd like to have a word with you

I'd like to talk to you, perhaps to issue a warning or reprimand. A: "Aunt Karen let me have ice cream for dinner!" B: "Is that so? Karen, I'd like to have a word with you."
See also: have, like, word

I'd like a word with you

I'd like to talk to you, perhaps to issue a warning or reprimand. A: "Aunt Karen let me have ice cream for dinner!" B: "Is that so? Karen, I'd like a word with you."
See also: like, word

I'd like to speak to (someone)

A request to talk to someone in particular. I'd like to speak to your supervisor. A: "I'd like to speak to Josh." B: "He's not available right now—can I take a message?"
See also: like, speak

I'd like to speak to (someone), please

A request to talk to someone in particular. I'd like to speak to your supervisor, please. A: "I'd like to speak to Josh, please." B: "He's not available right now—can I take a message?"
See also: like, please, speak

I'd rather face a firing squad than (do something)

I really do not want to (do something). A firing squad is a group of people assigned to execute someone by gunfire. The phrase hyperbolically implies that the speaker would rather face a gruesome death than do what is being discussed. I'd rather face a firing squad than do another presentation for the board. Last time, they found an error in my report and screamed at me for it.
See also: face, firing, rather, squad

I wish I'd said that.

a comment of praise or admiration for someone's clever remark. Mary: The weed of crime bears bitter fruit. Sue: I wish I'd said that. Mary: I wish I'd said it first. John: Tom is simply not able to see through the airy persiflage of Mary's prolix declamation. Jane: I wish I'd said that. John: I'm sorry I did.
See also: said, that, wish

ID

1. n. some kind of identification card. (Initialism.) Can you show me an ID?
2. tv. to determine the identity of someone; to check someone for a valid identification card. The cops IDed the driver in less than thirty minutes.