icing

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ice down

1. To apply ice to a particular body part or area, as after an injury or strenuous exercise. A noun or pronoun can be used between "ice" and "down." I need to ice down my ankle after that fall. The pitcher is icing his arm down after the big game.
2. To apply ice to something in order to keep its temperature low. A noun or pronoun can be used between "ice" and "down." They're icing down the organ for transport. Ice these drinks down, will you? No one wants warm beer.
See also: down, ice

ice out

1. To treat someone with a lack of affection or warmth. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "ice" and "out." I don't understand why Nelle is icing me out like this—what did I ever do to her?
2. slang To embellish something with diamonds. Did you see that rock he got her? Her finger is totally iced out now!
See also: ice, out

ice over

To become covered in or coated with ice. If the temperature drops any more, the steps will definitely ice over tonight.
See also: ice, over

ice the kicker

In American football, to call a time out just before the opposing team's kicker attempts a field goal, with the intent of negatively affecting the kicker's focus or confidence (i.e. "icing them" or "getting in their head"). Almost exclusively done at the end of the game when the field goal could win or tie the game. Even though they tried to ice the kicker, he still hit the 63-yard field goal attempt.
See also: ice, kicker

ice the puck

In ice hockey, to commit an icing, a minor infraction that occurs when the puck is advanced from behind one's own team's red line to beyond the other team's goal line without being touched by the other team. Come on, man, how could you ice the puck at a crucial time in the game like this?
See also: ice, puck

ice up

1. To become covered in or coated with ice. If the temperature drops any more, the steps will definitely ice up overnight.
2. To cause something to become covered in or coated with ice. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "ice" and "up." The frigid temperature iced the steps up overnight.
See also: ice, up

icing on the cake

An additional benefit or positive aspect to something that is already considered positive or beneficial. Having all of you here for my birthday has really been wonderful. This gift is icing on the cake. Sarah really wanted that job, so she said the signing bonus was really just icing on the cake.
See also: cake, icing, on

icing the kicker

In American football, the tactic of calling a time out just before the opposing team's kicker attempts a field goal, with the intent of negatively affecting the kicker's focus or confidence (i.e. "icing them" or "getting in their head"). Almost exclusively done at the end of the game when the field goal could win or tie the game. Hey, before you go out for your field goal, don't forget that their coach is known for icing the kicker.
See also: icing, kicker

ice over

[for water] to freeze and develop a covering of ice. I can't wait for the river to ice over so we can do some ice fishing.
See also: ice, over

ice something down

to cool something with ice. They are icing the champagne down now. They are icing down the champagne now.
See also: down, ice

ice something up

to cause something to become icy. I hope the cold doesn't ice the roads up. The wind and rain iced up the roads.
See also: ice, up

ice up

to become icy. Are the roads icing up?
See also: ice, up

icing on the cake

Fig. an extra enhancement. Oh, wow! A tank full of gas in my new car. That's icing on the cake! Your coming home for a few days was the icing on the cake.
See also: cake, icing, on

icing on the cake

Also, frosting on the cake. An additional benefit to something already good. For example, All these letters of congratulation are icing on the cake, or After that beautiful sunrise, the rainbow is just frosting on the cake. This metaphoric expression alludes to the sweet creamy coating used to enhance a cake. [Mid-1900s]
See also: cake, icing, on

the icing on the cake

BRITISH, AMERICAN or

the frosting on the cake

AMERICAN
COMMON
1. If you describe something as the icing on the cake, you mean that it is an extra good thing that makes a good situation or activity even better. To ride for one's country is the ultimate experience. To be in a winning team is the icing on the cake. If it works out that he or she becomes a friend after you have enjoyed a good professional relationship, that is frosting on the cake.
2. You can use the icing on the cake to refer to something which is only a minor part of the main thing you are talking about. Consumer electronics in Japan is now a 35 billion dollars a year business. This is just the icing on the cake. Japanese electronics companies are now generating an annual 200 billion dollars of sales. Finance Minister Vaclav Klaus has dismissed environmental issues as the frosting on the cake.
See also: cake, icing, on

the icing on the cake

an attractive but inessential addition or enhancement.
A North American variant of this phrase is the frosting on the cake .
1996 Independent State education is no longer always free. The jumble sale and the summer fair, which used to provide the icing on the school cake, are now providing the staple fare.
See also: cake, icing, on

the icing on the ˈcake

something attractive, but not necessary, which is added to something already very good: The meal was perfect, the wonderful view from the restaurant the icing on the cake.
See also: cake, icing, on

ice down

v.
1. To cool something or keep something cold with ice: I iced down a bottle of champagne. Ice the fish down until it's time to cook it.
2. To soothe something, especially a sore or injured muscle, by applying ice: The coach iced down the player's injury. Ice your sore muscles down; you'll feel better.
See also: down, ice

ice out

v. Slang
To cover or decorate something with diamonds: The medallion was completely iced out. The performers went to the jewelry store and iced out their wrists.
See also: ice, out

ice up

v.
1. To become covered with ice: The road has iced up, so be careful.
2. To cause something to become covered with ice: The storm has iced up the bridges. The cold weather iced the pond up, so we decided to go skating.
See also: ice, up

icing on the cake

n. an extra enhancement. Oh, wow! A tank full of gas in my new car. That’s icing on the cake!
See also: cake, icing, on

icing on the cake

An additional benefit to something already good.
See also: cake, icing, on

frosting/icing on the cake, the

An extra advantage or additional benefit. This term refers to the sweet creamy topping of a cake and has been transferred since the mid-1900s. A book review in The Listener used it: “All this theology is icing on the cake” (April 3, 1969; cited by the OED).
See also: frosting, icing, on
References in periodicals archive ?
4 Knead some green food colouring into the remaining icing and roll it out thinly on an icing-sugar-dusted surface.
Use a little of the icing pen to stick a chocolate button and peanut butter cup to the top of each marshmallow stack, then draw on a face and 3 dots for buttons.
Start by making a basic royal icing, then tweak it slightly to create the line icing (used for outlines, creating pattern and detail, while stopping the other icing spilling over the edges) and flooding icing (the larger area of icing on top of the biscuit).
| GREDIENTS: 4 pasturised egg whites 900g icing sugar Continue until the ingredients form a thick, smooth paste that is bright white and has the consistency of toothpaste.
Repeat the colouring process with the flooding icing. Look at your designs and count up the number of shades of flooding icing needed.
METHOD: Add the dry ingredients to the egg whites and whisk or beat for about five minutes if using an electric whisk, and LINE ICING 1.
Put the line icing into piping bags (two-thirds full, end snipped off, to make a line around a millimetre thick) and the flooding icing into squeezy bottles (you can use a spoon but it will take longer and be messier).
Study the biscuit and icing you want to copy, then pipe on the outline - have a few goes on parchment paper, until you've got the pressure right.
Be sure to go around the hole with line icing, too.
Once you've completed your lines, your first biscuit should be dry enough for the flooding icing. Choose your colour then squeeze the bottle to release the icing into the area you need it, and swirl it around, using the nozzle to fill the space.