icing


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

ice

1. noun, slang Diamonds. The pop star came out on stage covered from head to foot in ice. It must have been the most expensive outfit ever made. I bet she keeps her ice in the safe.
2. noun, slang Concentrated methamphetamine in crystalline form. I heard he got caught with two kilos of ice in the trunk of his car. He's going away for a long, long time. This part of town is overrun with dealers slinging ice on the corners.
3. noun, dated slang A bribe. There has always been a problem in this town with cops accepting ice from gangsters in order to look the other way when something illegal happens.
4. noun, dated slang An amount of money paid to a theater manager in order to secure tickets to a performance or event. He said he would throw some ice at the box office manager to make sure we had good seats.
5. verb, slang To murder (someone). The gang iced him for trying to make off with their money.
6. verb, slang To clinch or ensure the victory of (some sporting event). The last minute touchdown iced the game for the New York Giants.
7. verb, slang To close, finalize, or ensure the success of (some deal, endeavor, agreement, etc.). The president said he is eager to ice the trade agreement with the European Union.
8. verb, slang To postpone, delay, or suspend (something). We've had to ice our plans for the expansion until this investigation is concluded. The government indicated that they are icing any and all imports from foreign countries due to the quarantine.

ice down

1. To apply ice to a particular body part or area, as after an injury or strenuous exercise. A noun or pronoun can be used between "ice" and "down." I need to ice down my ankle after that fall. The pitcher is icing his arm down after the big game.
2. To apply ice to something in order to keep its temperature low. A noun or pronoun can be used between "ice" and "down." They're icing down the organ for transport. Ice these drinks down, will you? No one wants warm beer.
See also: down, ice

ice out

1. To treat someone with a lack of affection or warmth. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "ice" and "out." I don't understand why Nelle is icing me out like this—what did I ever do to her?
2. slang To embellish something with diamonds. Did you see that rock he got her? Her finger is totally iced out now!
See also: ice, out

ice over

1. To become covered in or coated with ice. We should put down some salt and gravel so the steps don't ice over during the night. The lake doesn't usually start icing over until November or December.
2. To cause something to become covered in or coated with ice. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "ice" and "over." The frigid temperature iced the steps over during the night.
See also: ice, over

ice the kicker

In American football, to call a time out just before the opposing team's kicker attempts a field goal, with the intent of negatively affecting the kicker's focus or confidence (i.e. "icing them" or "getting in their head"). Almost exclusively done at the end of the game when the field goal could win or tie the game. Even though they tried to ice the kicker, he still hit the 63-yard field goal attempt.
See also: ice, kicker

ice the puck

In ice hockey, to commit an icing, a minor infraction that occurs when the puck is advanced from behind one's own team's red line to beyond the other team's goal line without being touched by the other team. Come on, man, how could you ice the puck at a crucial time in the game like this?
See also: ice, puck

ice up

1. To become covered in or coated with ice. If the temperature drops any more, the steps will definitely ice up overnight.
2. To cause something to become covered in or coated with ice. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "ice" and "up." The frigid temperature iced the steps up overnight.
See also: ice, up

the icing on the cake

An additional benefit or positive aspect to something that is already considered positive or beneficial. Having all of you here for my birthday has really been wonderful. This gift is icing on the cake. Sarah really wanted that job, so she said the signing bonus was really just icing on the cake.
See also: cake, icing, on

icing the kicker

In American football, the tactic of calling a time out just before the opposing team's kicker attempts a field goal, with the intent of negatively affecting the kicker's focus or confidence (i.e. "icing them" or "getting in their head"). Almost exclusively done at the end of the game when the field goal could win or tie the game. Hey, before you go out for your field goal, don't forget that their coach is known for icing the kicker.
See also: icing, kicker
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

ice over

[for water] to freeze and develop a covering of ice. I can't wait for the river to ice over so we can do some ice fishing.
See also: ice, over

ice something down

to cool something with ice. They are icing the champagne down now. They are icing down the champagne now.
See also: down, ice

ice something up

to cause something to become icy. I hope the cold doesn't ice the roads up. The wind and rain iced up the roads.
See also: ice, up

ice up

to become icy. Are the roads icing up?
See also: ice, up

icing on the cake

Fig. an extra enhancement. Oh, wow! A tank full of gas in my new car. That's icing on the cake! Your coming home for a few days was the icing on the cake.
See also: cake, icing, on
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

icing on the cake

Also, frosting on the cake. An additional benefit to something already good. For example, All these letters of congratulation are icing on the cake, or After that beautiful sunrise, the rainbow is just frosting on the cake. This metaphoric expression alludes to the sweet creamy coating used to enhance a cake. [Mid-1900s]
See also: cake, icing, on
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

the icing on the cake

BRITISH, AMERICAN or

the frosting on the cake

AMERICAN
COMMON
1. If you describe something as the icing on the cake, you mean that it is an extra good thing that makes a good situation or activity even better. To ride for one's country is the ultimate experience. To be in a winning team is the icing on the cake. If it works out that he or she becomes a friend after you have enjoyed a good professional relationship, that is frosting on the cake.
2. You can use the icing on the cake to refer to something which is only a minor part of the main thing you are talking about. Consumer electronics in Japan is now a 35 billion dollars a year business. This is just the icing on the cake. Japanese electronics companies are now generating an annual 200 billion dollars of sales. Finance Minister Vaclav Klaus has dismissed environmental issues as the frosting on the cake.
See also: cake, icing, on
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

the icing on the cake

an attractive but inessential addition or enhancement.
A North American variant of this phrase is the frosting on the cake .
1996 Independent State education is no longer always free. The jumble sale and the summer fair, which used to provide the icing on the school cake, are now providing the staple fare.
See also: cake, icing, on
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

the icing on the ˈcake

something attractive, but not necessary, which is added to something already very good: The meal was perfect, the wonderful view from the restaurant the icing on the cake.
See also: cake, icing, on
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

ice down

v.
1. To cool something or keep something cold with ice: I iced down a bottle of champagne. Ice the fish down until it's time to cook it.
2. To soothe something, especially a sore or injured muscle, by applying ice: The coach iced down the player's injury. Ice your sore muscles down; you'll feel better.
See also: down, ice

ice out

v. Slang
To cover or decorate something with diamonds: The medallion was completely iced out. The performers went to the jewelry store and iced out their wrists.
See also: ice, out

ice up

v.
1. To become covered with ice: The road has iced up, so be careful.
2. To cause something to become covered with ice: The storm has iced up the bridges. The cold weather iced the pond up, so we decided to go skating.
See also: ice, up
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

ice

1. n. diamonds; jewels. (Underworld.) That old dame has tons of ice in her hotel room.
2. n. cocaine; crystalline cocaine. (Drugs.) Max deals mostly in ice but can get you almost anything.
3. tv. to kill someone; to kill an informer. (see also chill.) Mr. Big ordered Sam to ice you-know-who.
4. tv. to ignore someone. (see also chill.) Bart iced Sam for obvious reasons.
5. tv. to embarrass someone; to make someone look foolish. Don’t ice me in front of my friends.
6. n. money given as a bribe, especially to the police. (Underworld.) A lot of those cops take ice.
7. mod. excellent; very cool. Her answer was ice, and she really put down that guy.

icing on the cake

n. an extra enhancement. Oh, wow! A tank full of gas in my new car. That’s icing on the cake!
See also: cake, icing, on
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

icing on the cake

An additional benefit to something already good.
See also: cake, icing, on
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

frosting/icing on the cake, the

An extra advantage or additional benefit. This term refers to the sweet creamy topping of a cake and has been transferred since the mid-1900s. A book review in The Listener used it: “All this theology is icing on the cake” (April 3, 1969; cited by the OED).
See also: frosting, icing, on
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
See also:
References in periodicals archive ?
The three terms known icing, known ice accretion and known icing conditions are often used interchangeably.
Documents related to known icing require forecasts to be validated through observation.
Therefore, they are motivated to provide guidance that precludes flying in potential icing. FAA Legal wrote that pilots should not expose themselves to the risk associated with potential icing.
Then, when potential icing becomes known by observation, an alternate strategy is immediately ready to be implemented.
According to the FAA, "If the composite [of available weather] information indicates to a reasonable and prudent pilot that he or she will be operating the aircraft under conditions that will cause ice to adhere to the aircraft along the proposed route and altitude of flight, then known icing conditions likely exist.
The current FAA definition of "known icing conditions," then, provides greater flexibility to pilots planning flights in areas of below-freezing conditions, and places responsibility on the pilot-in-command (where it should be) to actively plan a route and altitude that will keep his or her aircraft out of conditions of visible moisture in the range of temperatures and conditions conducive to airframe ice accumulation.
The FAA's interpretation is entirely consistent with most aviation mentors, instructors and training providers' advice to "always have an out" when faced with the possibility weather reports or the pilot's planning may prove wrong and actual icing conditions exist.
* Learn the cues and exit procedures of severe icing for your airplane.
* Some airplanes may exhibit little visual cues, such as side-window icing. On single-engine airplanes, spinner ice, which may provide a cue in multiengine airplanes, cannot be seen by the pilot.
* Most icing encounters are of low water content and drop size, so if you have safely exited one encounter, or hear hangar talk that your airplane is okay in icing, don't gamble that the next encounter will have the same result.
"The General Aviation Safety Challenge" document on icing may be found online at www.faasafety.gov/files/notices/2008/Nov/GAIcing.pdf.