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ice

1. noun, slang Diamonds. The pop star came out on stage covered from head to foot in ice. It must have been the most expensive outfit ever made. I bet she keeps her ice in the safe.
2. noun, slang Concentrated methamphetamine in crystalline form. I heard he got caught with two kilos of ice in the trunk of his car. He's going away for a long, long time. This part of town is overrun with dealers slinging ice on the corners.
3. noun, dated slang A bribe. There has always been a problem in this town with cops accepting ice from gangsters in order to look the other way when something illegal happens.
4. noun, dated slang An amount of money paid to a theater manager in order to secure tickets to a performance or event. He said he would throw some ice at the box office manager to make sure we had good seats.
5. verb, slang To murder (someone). The gang iced him for trying to make off with their money.
6. verb, slang To clinch or ensure the victory of (some sporting event). The last minute touchdown iced the game for the New York Giants.
7. verb, slang To close, finalize, or ensure the success of (some deal, endeavor, agreement, etc.). The president said he is eager to ice the trade agreement with the European Union.
8. verb, slang To postpone, delay, or suspend (something). We've had to ice our plans for the expansion until this investigation is concluded. The government indicated that they are icing any and all imports from foreign countries due to the quarantine.
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

ice

1. n. diamonds; jewels. (Underworld.) That old dame has tons of ice in her hotel room.
2. n. cocaine; crystalline cocaine. (Drugs.) Max deals mostly in ice but can get you almost anything.
3. tv. to kill someone; to kill an informer. (see also chill.) Mr. Big ordered Sam to ice you-know-who.
4. tv. to ignore someone. (see also chill.) Bart iced Sam for obvious reasons.
5. tv. to embarrass someone; to make someone look foolish. Don’t ice me in front of my friends.
6. n. money given as a bribe, especially to the police. (Underworld.) A lot of those cops take ice.
7. mod. excellent; very cool. Her answer was ice, and she really put down that guy.

iced

mod. settled once and for all; done easily. I’ve got it iced. Nothing to it.
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in classic literature ?
The Tununirmiut returned from the yearly salmon-fishing, and made their houses on the early ice to the north of Bylot's Island, ready to go after the seal as soon as the sea froze.
Kotuko went out, day after day, with a light hunting-sleigh and six or seven of the strongest dogs, looking till his eyes ached for some patch of clear ice where a seal might perhaps have scratched a breathing-hole.
One night--he had unbuckled himself after ten hours' waiting above a "blind" seal-hole, and was staggering back to the village faint and dizzy--he halted to lean his back against a boulder which happened to be supported like a rocking-stone on a single jutting point of ice. His weight disturbed the balance of the thing, it rolled over ponderously, and as Kotuko sprang aside to avoid it, slid after him, squeaking and hissing on the ice-slope.
They will show him open ice. He will bring us the seal again!" Their voices were soon swallowed up by the cold, empty dark, and Kotuko and the girl shouldered close together as they strained on the pulling-rope or humoured the sleigh through the ice in the direction of the Polar Sea.
There were gullies and ravines, and holes like gravel-pits, cut in ice; lumps and scattered pieces frozen down to the original floor of the floe; blotches of old black ice that had been thrust under the floe in some gale and heaved up again; roundish boulders of ice; saw-like edges of ice carved by the snow that flies before the wind; and sunken pits where thirty or forty acres lay below the level of the rest of the field.
Kotuko laid up a snow-house large enough to take in the hand-sleigh (never be separated from your meat), and while he was shaping the last irregular block of ice that makes the key-stone of the roof, he saw a Thing looking at him from a little cliff of ice half a mile away.
but do you forget that the Nautilus is armed with a powerful spur, and could we not send it diagonally against these fields of ice, which would open at the shocks."
The frozen poles of the earth do not coincide, either in the southern or in the northern regions; and, until it is proved to the contrary, we may suppose either a continent or an ocean free from ice at these two points of the globe."
About ten men mounted the sides of the Nautilus, armed with pickaxes to break the ice around the vessel, which was soon free.
This would give three thousand feet of ice above us; one thousand being above the water-mark.
Now they arrived at the base of a great knob or dome veneered with ice and powdered with snow--the utmost, summit, the last bit of solidity between them and the hollow vault of heaven.
At twelve o'clock, when the sun peeped over the earth-bulge, they stopped and built a small fire on the ice. Daylight, with the ax, chopped chunks off the frozen sausage of beans.
The connection between the transportal of boulders and the presence of ice in some form, is strikingly shown by their geographical distribution over the earth.
The soil here consists of ice and volcanic ashes interstratified; and at a little depth beneath the surface it must remain perpetually congealed, for Lieut.
From our new Cape Horn in Denmark, a chain of mountains, scarcely half the height of the Alps, would run in a straight line due southward; and on its western flank every deep creek of the sea, or fiord, would end in "bold and astonishing glaciers." These lonely channels would frequently reverberate with the falls of ice, and so often would great waves rush along their coasts; numerous icebergs, some as tall as cathedrals, and occasionally loaded with "no inconsiderable blocks of rock," would be stranded on the outlying islets; at intervals violent earthquakes would shoot prodigious masses of ice into the waters below.