iced


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ice

1. noun, slang Diamonds. The pop star came out on stage covered from head to foot in ice. It must have been the most expensive outfit ever made. I bet she keeps her ice in the safe.
2. noun, slang Concentrated methamphetamine in crystalline form. I heard he got caught with two kilos of ice in the trunk of his car. He's going away for a long, long time. This part of town is overrun with dealers slinging ice on the corners.
3. noun, dated slang A bribe. There has always been a problem in this town with cops accepting ice from gangsters in order to look the other way when something illegal happens.
4. noun, dated slang An amount of money paid to a theater manager in order to secure tickets to a performance or event. He said he would throw some ice at the box office manager to make sure we had good seats.
5. verb, slang To murder (someone). The gang iced him for trying to make off with their money.
6. verb, slang To clinch or ensure the victory of (some sporting event). The last minute touchdown iced the game for the New York Giants.
7. verb, slang To close, finalize, or ensure the success of (some deal, endeavor, agreement, etc.). The president said he is eager to ice the trade agreement with the European Union.
8. verb, slang To postpone, delay, or suspend (something). We've had to ice our plans for the expansion until this investigation is concluded. The government indicated that they are icing any and all imports from foreign countries due to the quarantine.

ice down

1. To apply ice to a particular body part or area, as after an injury or strenuous exercise. A noun or pronoun can be used between "ice" and "down." I need to ice down my ankle after that fall. The pitcher is icing his arm down after the big game.
2. To apply ice to something in order to keep its temperature low. A noun or pronoun can be used between "ice" and "down." They're icing down the organ for transport. Ice these drinks down, will you? No one wants warm beer.
See also: down, ice

ice out

1. To treat someone with a lack of affection or warmth. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "ice" and "out." I don't understand why Nelle is icing me out like this—what did I ever do to her?
2. slang To embellish something with diamonds. Did you see that rock he got her? Her finger is totally iced out now!
See also: ice, out

ice over

1. To become covered in or coated with ice. We should put down some salt and gravel so the steps don't ice over during the night. The lake doesn't usually start icing over until November or December.
2. To cause something to become covered in or coated with ice. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "ice" and "over." The frigid temperature iced the steps over during the night.
See also: ice, over

ice the kicker

In American football, to call a time out just before the opposing team's kicker attempts a field goal, with the intent of negatively affecting the kicker's focus or confidence (i.e. "icing them" or "getting in their head"). Almost exclusively done at the end of the game when the field goal could win or tie the game. Even though they tried to ice the kicker, he still hit the 63-yard field goal attempt.
See also: ice, kicker

ice the puck

In ice hockey, to commit an icing, a minor infraction that occurs when the puck is advanced from behind one's own team's red line to beyond the other team's goal line without being touched by the other team. Come on, man, how could you ice the puck at a crucial time in the game like this?
See also: ice, puck

ice up

1. To become covered in or coated with ice. If the temperature drops any more, the steps will definitely ice up overnight.
2. To cause something to become covered in or coated with ice. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "ice" and "up." The frigid temperature iced the steps up overnight.
See also: ice, up

iced out

slang Embellished with diamonds. Did you see that rock he got her? Her finger is totally iced out now!
See also: iced, out
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

ice over

[for water] to freeze and develop a covering of ice. I can't wait for the river to ice over so we can do some ice fishing.
See also: ice, over

ice something down

to cool something with ice. They are icing the champagne down now. They are icing down the champagne now.
See also: down, ice

ice something up

to cause something to become icy. I hope the cold doesn't ice the roads up. The wind and rain iced up the roads.
See also: ice, up

ice up

to become icy. Are the roads icing up?
See also: ice, up
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

ice down

v.
1. To cool something or keep something cold with ice: I iced down a bottle of champagne. Ice the fish down until it's time to cook it.
2. To soothe something, especially a sore or injured muscle, by applying ice: The coach iced down the player's injury. Ice your sore muscles down; you'll feel better.
See also: down, ice

ice out

v. Slang
To cover or decorate something with diamonds: The medallion was completely iced out. The performers went to the jewelry store and iced out their wrists.
See also: ice, out

ice up

v.
1. To become covered with ice: The road has iced up, so be careful.
2. To cause something to become covered with ice: The storm has iced up the bridges. The cold weather iced the pond up, so we decided to go skating.
See also: ice, up
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

ice

1. n. diamonds; jewels. (Underworld.) That old dame has tons of ice in her hotel room.
2. n. cocaine; crystalline cocaine. (Drugs.) Max deals mostly in ice but can get you almost anything.
3. tv. to kill someone; to kill an informer. (see also chill.) Mr. Big ordered Sam to ice you-know-who.
4. tv. to ignore someone. (see also chill.) Bart iced Sam for obvious reasons.
5. tv. to embarrass someone; to make someone look foolish. Don’t ice me in front of my friends.
6. n. money given as a bribe, especially to the police. (Underworld.) A lot of those cops take ice.
7. mod. excellent; very cool. Her answer was ice, and she really put down that guy.

iced

mod. settled once and for all; done easily. I’ve got it iced. Nothing to it.

iced out

mod. wearing lots of diamonds (see also ice (sense 1).) That dude is really iced out!
See also: iced, out
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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