hurry

(redirected from hurrying)
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in one hell of a hurry

Extremely rushed. You must be in one hell of a hurry, driving that fast! Look, I'm in one hell of a hurry, so I can't chat right now!
See also: hell, hurry, of, one

hurry up and (do something)

To do something quickly. Typically used as an imperative. Hurry up and get dressed before everyone gets here. She'd better hurry up and submit her application if she doesn't want to miss the deadline.
See also: and, hurry, up

hurry up and wait

To quickly take some action, only to be halted at the next step in the process. If you're going to fly, be prepared to hurry up and wait—those security lines take forever to get through. Why do all these people rush out of the stadium before the game is over? They're just going to hurry up and wait in the parking lot.
See also: and, hurry, up, wait

(one) won't (do something) again in a hurry

One had a very unpleasant or difficult experience with something and does not plan to do it again. That Mexican food gave me a horrible stomach ache. I won't eat such spicy food again in a hurry, that's for sure! Tom broke his leg after trying to hold onto a car while skateboarding. I guess he won't do that again in a hurry.
See also: again, hurry

(one) won't be (doing something) again in a hurry

One had a very unpleasant or difficult experience with something and does not plan to do it again. That Mexican food gave me a horrible stomach ache. I won't be eating such spicy food again in a hurry, that's for sure! Tom broke his leg after trying to hold onto a car while skateboarding. I guess he won't be doing that again in a hurry.
See also: again, hurry

(one) wouldn't (do something) again in a hurry

One had a very unpleasant or difficult experience with something and does not plan to do it again. That Mexican food gave me a horrible stomach ache. I wouldn't eat such spicy food again in a hurry, that's for sure! We got mugged twice in the span of two weeks while we were there, so we wouldn't go back to that country again in a hurry.
See also: again, hurry

in a hurry

1. adjective Having very little time (to do something or be somewhere); very busy or rushed. Sorry, I'm in a hurry. Could we do this interview tomorrow? I wanted to ask my professor about the exam, but I could see she was in a hurry.
2. adverb Very quickly, especially more so than is normal. The car left the scene of the crime in a hurry. He grabbed the package and then walked out of the office in a hurry.
See also: hurry

in a hurry to do something

1. Trying to do something very quickly. We were in a hurry to get the project done before the Christmas vacation.
2. Very eager or impatient to do something. I don't understand why my kids are in such a hurry to be adults—all I want to do is be a kid again! Why are you in such a hurry to see this movie?
See also: hurry, something

in no hurry

1. Having an ample amount of time (to do something or be somewhere); not at all busy or rushed. We can do the interview now, if you prefer. I'm in no rush. I'm in no hurry, so I don't mind if you go first.
2. Not particularly eager, willing, or desiring. Usually followed by "to (do something)." Please make sure the accounts are completely in order. I'm in no hurry to have the IRS do an audit on us right now. I don't mind staying home with the kids. I'm really in no hurry to go to the gym tonight, if I'm honest.
See also: hurry, no

not in a/any hurry

1. Having an ample amount of time (to do something or be somewhere); not at all busy or rushed. We can do the interview now, if you prefer. I'm not in a hurry. I'm not in any hurry, so I don't mind if you go first.
2. Not particularly eager, willing, or desiring. Usually followed by "to (do something)." Please make sure the accounts are completely in order. I'm not in a hurry to have the IRS do an audit on us right now. I don't mind staying home with the kids. I'm not really in any hurry to go to the gym tonight, if I'm honest.
See also: any, hurry, not

a tearing rush

An extremely fast, hurried pace. He flew out of the office in a tearing rush, so I never got to ask him about the software update. Sorry for being so brusque yesterday—I was running late for my daughter's recital and was in a tearing rush.
See also: rush, tearing

a tearing hurry

An extremely fast, hurried pace. He flew out of the office in a tearing hurry, so I never got to ask him about the software update. Sorry for being so brusque yesterday—I was running late for my daughter's recital and was in a tearing hurry.
See also: hurry, tearing

hurry up

1. To move faster. In this usage, the phrase is often used as an imperative. Hurry up, kids, lunch is getting cold! Would you hurry up already? I'd liked to get to the concert before it's over.
2. To cause someone or something to move faster. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "hurry" and "up." Can you hurry the kids up? Lunch is getting cold. Any chance we can hurry up this meeting? I have dinner reservations.
See also: hurry, up

get a hurry on

To move, proceed, or work faster; to hurry. Get a hurry on, kids, or we're going to be late for the movie! We've got to get a hurry on if we want to finish this project by the end of the week.
See also: get, hurry, on

get a hurry on

 and get a move on
to start to hurry. We are going to leave in five minutes, Jane. Get a hurry on! Mary! Get a move on! We can't wait all day.
See also: get, hurry, on

Here's your hat, what's your hurry?

Rur. It is time for you to go. (Jocular.) I hate to rush you out the door, but here's your hat, what's your hurry? Jane: I suppose I'd better be on my way. Charlie: Here's your hat, what's your hurry?

hurry away

 and hurry off
to leave in a hurry. I have to hurry away. Excuse me, please. It's an emergency. Don't hurry off. I need to talk to you.
See also: away, hurry

hurry back (to someone or something)

to return to someone or something immediately or as fast as possible. Oh, please hurry back to me as soon as you can. Hurry back!
See also: back, hurry

hurry down (to somewhere)

to descend rapidly. We need you down here in the basement. Hurry down. Please hurry down to the kitchen and help us.
See also: down, hurry

hurry one on one's way

to help someone to hasten on. Mary hurried Joel on his way so he could catch his train. There is no need to hurry me on my way. I am leaving.
See also: hurry, on, one, way

hurry someone or something along

to make someone or something go faster. Go hurry your mother along. We're almost late. Why don't you hurry the meeting along?
See also: hurry

hurry someone or something in (to something)

to make someone or something go into something fast. She hurried the chickens into the coop and closed the door on them for the night. It was beginning to rain, so Jerry hurried the children in.
See also: hurry

hurry someone or something up

to make someone or something go or work faster. Please hurry them all up. We are expecting to have dinner very soon. See if you can hurry this project up a little.
See also: hurry, up

hurry up

 and hurry on
to move faster. Hurry up! You're going to be late. Please hurry on. We have a lot to do today.
See also: hurry, up

hurry up and wait

Fig. to do some things in a series fast and then have to wait a long time to do the next things in the series. (Originally military.) That's all we ever do. Rush to stand in line somewhere. We just hurry up and wait all day long. Hurry up and wait! That's the army for you.
See also: and, hurry, up, wait

hurry up and wait

Move quickly and then have to wait for something or someone. For example, We did our share in good time, but the others were several days behind so we couldn't finish-it was another case of hurry up and wait . This expression dates from the 1940s and probably originated in the armed services.
See also: and, hurry, up, wait

in a ˈhurry


1 very quickly or more quickly than usual: He had to leave in a hurry.
2 not having enough time to do something: Sorry, I haven’t got time to do it now — I’m in a hurry.
See also: hurry

in a ˈhurry to do something

impatient to do something: My daughter is in such a hurry to grow up.
See also: hurry, something

in no ˈhurry (to do something)

,

not in a/any ˈhurry (to do something)


1 having plenty of time: I don’t mind waiting — I’m not in any particular hurry.Serve this lady first — I’m in no hurry.
2 not wanting or not willing to do something: We were in no hurry to get back to work after the holidays.
See also: hurry, no

I, he, etc. won’t do something again in a ˈhurry

(spoken) used to say that somebody does not want to do something again because it was not enjoyable: I won’t be going there again in a hurry — the food was terrible.
See also: again, hurry, something

(be in) a tearing ˈhurry/ˈrush

(especially British English) (be) in a very great hurry: I was late for a meeting and in a tearing hurry.
See also: hurry, rush, tearing

hurry up

v.
1. To move more quickly: Hurry up or you'll miss the bus! I hurried up and finished the test.
2. To make someone move or something happen more quickly: The coach hurried up the team. The babysitter hurried the children up and took them to school.
See also: hurry, up

hurry up and wait

in. to be alternately rushed and delayed in a hectic situation. (Often with the force of a modifier.) It’s always hurry up and wait around here.
See also: and, hurry, up, wait

hurry up and wait

Rush to an appointment or make haste in response to an order and then be required to wait for a long time. This expression became current in the armed forces during World War II and quickly moved into civilian life. Greg Rucka described it graphically in A Gentleman’s Game (2004): “It’s hurry up and wait, you knew that was the job when you signed up. Months of sitting . . . punctuated by bouts of . . . panic.”
See also: and, hurry, up, wait
References in classic literature ?
He heard their screams, and, hurrying round the corner, saw a couple of men struggling to drag them out of the little pony-chaise in which they had been driving, while a third with difficulty held the frightened pony's head.
A great bank of dust, white and luminous in the blaze of the sun, made everything within twenty feet of the ground grey and indistinct and was perpetually renewed by the hurrying feet of a dense crowd of horses and of men and women on foot, and by the wheels of vehicles of every de- scription.
So much as they could see of the road Londonward between the houses to the right was a tumultuous stream of dirty, hurrying people, pent in between the villas on either side; the black heads, the crowded forms, grew into distinct- ness as they rushed towards the corner, hurried past, and merged their individuality again in a receding multitude that was swallowed up at last in a cloud of dust.
And in the evening many people came hurrying along the road near- by their stopping place, fleeing from unknown dangers before them, and going in the direction from which my brother had come.
She smiled squarely into the face of a boy who was hurrying by with his hands buried in his overcoat, his blonde locks bobbing on his youthful temples, and a cheery smile of unconcern upon his lips.
Spotting danger among the greenery, Queenie springs into action, hurry, hurry, hurrying to warn her family just in the nick of time!
Silence, golden silence How I love your soft sweet tune Only the sound of silence On this sunny afternoon Not many have the time to stop Just for a little while To take in the gifts of God Just sitting on a stile All they wish to do Is go hurrying on their way Not even have the time to stop To pass the time of day Hurry, hurry, is man's modern way No wonder things they do Very soon go wrong Man used to walk more slowly Slowly on his way Find a precious moment For a kindly word to say Could make a lonely person A happy, happy day.
Put that music copy down!" She came hurrying down the stairs.