think (one) hung the moon

(redirected from hung the moon)

think (one) hung the moon

To consider someone to be extraordinary, the best, or exceptionally wonderful. Your little sister absolutely adores you. She thinks you hung the moon!
See also: hung, moon, think

think someone hung the moon (and stars)

 and think someone is God's own cousin
Rur. to think someone is perfect. Joe won't listen to any complaints about Mary. He thinks she hung the moon and stars. Jim is awful stuck-up. He thinks he's God's own cousin.
See also: hung, moon, think
References in periodicals archive ?
She is also a well-established author of children books, such as "When I Was Little: A Four-Year Old's Memoir of Her Youth" (1993), "I'm Gonna Like Me: Letting Off a Little Self-Esteem" (2002), "My Mommy Hung the Moon: A Love Story" (2010) and many more.
Some clients will think you hung the moon. Others will grab your cape and shred it up with a single critical statement.
Maybe it's not cool to say, but I think she hung the moon.
We thought Jack Nicklaus had hung the moon when he won the Masters at 46 and this is 13 years on from that.
Most girls believe their BFFs hung the moon, but what really makes a friendship rise to the top?
"Not only did I think that she hung the moon," Malone says of her mother, "but I thought it was a really cool way to live.
The speaker, X, has been gone from Waylah Falls for "four springs" and "five winters," gone from his love, Shelley, who "hung the moon backwards, crooned crooked poems / That no voice could straighten," who "curled among notes-petals / That scaled glissando from windows agape,' but from whom he has been absent: "My pain will never end unless I can sleep beside my love, pluck the ripe moon, halve it, and share its sweet milk between us ....
No one, especially her big brother, wants to ruin Pert's fairy tale image of her father, but Pert has learned that, although she thought her daddy hung the moon, the moon has two sides, a dark and light.
The speaker, X, has been gone from Waylah Falls for "four springs" and "five winters," gone from his love, Shelley, who "hung the moon backwards, crooned crooked poems / That no voice could straighten," who "curled among notes - petals / That scaled glissando from windows agape," but from whom he has been absent: "My pain will never end unless I can sleep beside my love, pluck the ripe moon, halve it, and share its sweet milk between us .