hundred


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Related to hundred: Hundred Years War

110 proof

Extremely strong or potent. Its original sense refers to the alcohol content of liquor. This cleanser is 110 proof. If it can't get the stain out, nothing can.
See also: 110, proof

800-pound gorilla

A person, group, or organization so powerful (either by size or by influence) that it does not need to heed the rules or threats of others. It refers to the riddle "Where does an 800-pound gorilla sit?" (Answer: "Wherever it likes.") Primarily heard in US. Don't mess with that guy; he's like an 800-pound gorilla! These big corporations act like 800-pound gorillas, making up the rules to suit themselves.
See also: gorilla

a hundred and ten percent

An effort towards something that is greater than one believes one is capable of doing, i.e., beyond 100% of one's ability; often used as a motivation in sports. Primarily heard in US. Alright guys, we all need to dig deep for the second half of the game. Go out there and give a hundred and ten percent and bring home a win!
See also: and, hundred, percent, ten

bat five hundred

To be correct or successful around half of the time. Taken from baseball terminology, referring to the average times a player makes a hit when at bat (i.e. the batting average). One hit for every two at-bats is a .500 batting average. Primarily heard in US, South Africa. That math exam didn't go so well, I only batted five hundred or so. The market is so hit and miss at the moment, you can only really expect to be batting five hundred at best.
See also: bat, five, hundred

give 110%

To put forth the absolute maximum amount of effort or energy possible (i.e., even more than is usually required or seems possible). We're going to have to give 110% if we want to get this project finished by the deadline. A win today secures our spot in the championship, so go out there and give 110%!
See also: give

apply for Chiltern Hundreds

To leave one's job/office/post. If members of the British House of Parliament wish to resign from office before the end of their term, they must apply to the honorary post of the "Chiltern Hundreds" (an obsolete administrative district in south-central England). Primarily heard in UK. I can't stand this job's stressful clients and erratic schedule any longer—it's time for me to apply for the Chiltern Hundreds. You better give Mark a raise or something. Otherwise, I think he's going to apply for the Chiltern Hundreds, and then you'll have to fill his position all over again!
See also: apply, Hundred

oh dark hundred

In military time, a non-specific time in the early morning, before the sun rises. Why are we meeting at oh dark hundred? That's too early to do anything besides sleep!
See also: dark, hundred, oh

the Four Hundred

The wealthiest and most powerful of the social elite. The phrase allegedly originated from the number of people that Caroline Schermerhorn Astor (wife of US millionaire John Jacob Astor) could fit inside her ballroom. Primarily heard in US. Thanks to my new husband, I am now part of the Four Hundred and the recipient of many jealous looks.
See also: four, hundred

by the dozen

in groups of 12. (Compare this with by the dozens.) Eggs are normally sold by the dozen.
See also: dozen

do a one-eighty

 and turn one hundred and eighty degrees 
1. Lit. to turn around and go in the opposite direction. When I hollered, the dog did a one-eighty and headed back to its own yard.
2. Fig. to radically reverse a decision or opinion. His political philosophy turned one hundred and eighty degrees when he grew a little older.

first hundred years are the hardest

Prov. The first hundred years of your life are the hardest, and after that, you can expect things to get easier; in other words, your whole life will probably be difficult. (A jocular, ironic way to console someone who is having difficulties.) Don't worry; things are bound to improve for you. The first hundred years are the hardest.
See also: first, hard, hundred, year

one in a thousand

 and one in a hundred; one in a million
Fig. nearly unique; one of a very few. He's a great guy. He's one in million. Mary's one in a hundredsuch a hard worker.
See also: one, thousand

by the dozen

Also, by the hundred or thousand . According to a definite quantity, as in She's buying tapes by the dozen. This usage is generally employed for some kind of rate. A 1950 film about efficiency expert Frank Gilbreth and his family was entitled Cheaper by the Dozen. [c. 1300]
See also: dozen

by the ˈdozen

many at the same time: On her birthday, she always receives cards by the dozen.
See also: dozen

a hundred/thousand/million and one things/things to do, etc.

(informal) very many or too many (things to do, people to see, etc.): I’m so busy — I’ve got lectures to prepare and a hundred and one letters to write — I just don’t know where to start.She’s always got a thousand and one excuses for everything.

a/one hundred per ˈcent

completely: I agree with you one hundred per cent.
See also: cent, hundred, one, per

not a hundred/thousand/million ˈmiles away/from here

(humorous) used to identify somebody/something indirectly: The person I’m talking about is not a hundred miles from here, but I’m not in a position to say who he is.We’re talking about a factory not a million miles away.

it’s a hundred, etc. to one that somebody/something will (not) do something

it is almost certain that somebody/something will (not) do something: It’s a hundred to one that the train will be late.It’s a million to one that she’ll finish before us. She always does.

not/never in a hundred, etc. ˈyears

(spoken) used to emphasize that you will/would never do something: I’d never have thought of that in a million years.
See also: never, not, year
References in classic literature ?
During our travels, the Indians entertained me well; and their affection for me was so great, that they utterly refused to leave me there with the others, although the Governor offered them one hundred pounds Sterling for me, on purpose to give me a parole to go home.
So help me Heaven, as there is nought in it but some merchandises which I will gladly part with to you one hundred yards of Lincoln green to make doublets to thy men, and a hundred staves of Spanish yew to make bows, and a hundred silken bowstrings, tough, round, and sound these will I send thee for thy good-will, honest Diccon, an thou wilt keep silence about the vault, my good Diccon.
However, he tried to console himself by removing all the beautiful furniture, which more than made up for the five hundred gold pieces he had lost.
And by 1901 they had put in use more than a million telephones and were professing to have a capital of a hundred millions.
As we neared the plaza and my presence was discovered we were immediately surrounded by hundreds of the creatures who seemed anxious to pluck me from my seat behind my guard.
She was then three hundred miles from Cape Clear, and, after three days' delay, which caused great uneasiness in Liverpool, she entered the basin of the company.
For my part, I should not hesitate a moment; I should take the hundred pistoles.
I understand," answered Porthos, "I understand you perfectly, on my honor; two hundred louis, each of us, would be making a pretty thing of it; but what will people say?
What, just when I've paid a hundred dollars for a pocket-handkerchief?
When we arrived at Edinburgh Sir Edward told me that as the Widow of his son, he desired I would accept from his Hands of four Hundred a year.
The abbe looked maliciously at Gourville, and anxiously at Fouquet, and said, "I have three hundred pistoles to pay to M.
They ascended to the foot of the first rapid, about two hundred miles, but could hear nothing of any white men being in the neighborhood.
The sacristan showed us a marble stairway (of course it was marble, and of the purest and whitest--there is no other stone, no brick, no wood, among its building materials) and told us to go up one hundred and eighty-two steps and stop till he came.
This island, lying near to the eastern coast of Africa, is in the sixth degree of south latitude, that is to say, four hundred and thirty geographical miles below the equator.
A sacristan commanded one party which captured several hundred prisoners in the course of a month; and there was Vasilisa, the wife of a village elder, who slew hundreds of the French.