humble

(redirected from humblest)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal.

eat crow

To admit that one is wrong, usually when doing so triggers great embarrassment or shame. Ugh, now that my idea has failed, I'll have to eat crow in the board meeting tomorrow. I think Ellen is a perfectionist because the thought of having to eat crow terrifies her.
See also: crow, eat

eat humble pie

To admit that one is wrong, usually when doing so triggers great embarrassment or shame. Ugh, now that my idea has failed, I'll have to eat humble pie in the board meeting tomorrow. I think Ellen is a perfectionist because the thought of having to eat humble pie terrifies her.
See also: eat, humble, pie

eat crow

 
1. . Fig. to display total humility, especially when shown to be wrong. Well, it looks like I was wrong, and I'm going to have to eat crow. I'll be eating crow if I'm not shown to be right.
2. Fig. to be shamed; to admit that one was wrong. When it became clear that they had arrested the wrong person, the police had to eat crow. Mary talked to Joe as if he was an uneducated idiot, till she found out he was a college professor. That made her eat crow.
See also: crow, eat

eat humble pie

to act very humble when one is shown to be wrong. I think I'm right, but if I'm wrong, I'll eat humble pie. You think you're so smart. I hope you have to eat humble pie.
See also: eat, humble, pie

in my humble opinion

Cliché a phrase introducing the speaker's opinion. "In my humble opinion," began Fred, arrogantly, "I have achieved what no one else ever could." Bob: What are we going to do about the poor condition of the house next door? Bill: In my humble opinion, we will mind our own business.
See also: humble, opinion

eat crow

Also, eat dirt or humble pie . Be forced to admit a humiliating mistake, as in When the reporter got the facts all wrong, his editor made him eat crow. The first term's origin has been lost, although a story relates that it involved a War of 1812 encounter in which a British officer made an American soldier eat part of a crow he had shot in British territory. Whether or not it is true, the fact remains that crow meat tastes terrible. The two variants originated in Britain. Dirt obviously tastes bad. And humble pie alludes to a pie made from umbles, a deer's undesirable innards (heart, liver, entrails). [Early 1800s] Also see eat one's words.
See also: crow, eat

eat crow

AMERICAN
If someone eats crow, they admit that they have been wrong and apologize. He wanted to make his critics eat crow. I didn't want to eat crow the rest of my life if my theories were wrong. Note: The usual British expression is eat humble pie.
See also: crow, eat

eat humble pie

If someone eats humble pie, they admit that they have been wrong and apologize. The Queen's Press secretary was forced to eat humble pie yesterday and publicly apologize to the duchess. The critics were too quick to give their verdict on us. We hope they'll be eating humble pie before the end of the season. Note: Humble pie is sometimes used in other structures with a similar meaning. After their victory, he took delight in handing out large helpings of humble pie to just about everyone. Note: `Umbles' is an old word for the guts and offal (= organs such as the liver) of deer. When rich people had the good parts of the meat to eat, the `umbles' were made into a pie for their servants. As `umbles' pie was eaten by `humble' people, the two words gradually became confused. `Humble pie' came to be used to refer to something humiliating or unpleasant.
See also: eat, humble, pie

eat crow

be humiliated by your defeats or mistakes. North American informal
In the USA ‘boiled crow’ has been a metaphor for something extremely disagreeable since the late 19th century.
See also: crow, eat

eat humble pie

make a humble apology and accept humiliation.
Humble pie is from a mid 19th-century pun based on umbles , meaning ‘offal’, which was considered to be an inferior food.
1998 Spectator A white youth behind us did shout racial abuse. But…after the game was over his companions forced him to come up to Darcus to eat humble pie.
See also: eat, humble, pie

ˌeat humble ˈpie

(British English) (American English eat ˈcrow) say and show that you are sorry for a mistake that you made: I had to eat humble pie when Harry, who I said would never have any success, won first prize.This comes from a pun on the old word umbles, meaning ‘offal’ (= the inside parts of an animal), which was considered inferior food.
See also: eat, humble, pie

eat crow

tv. to display total humility, especially when shown to be wrong. Well, it looks like I was wrong, and I’m going to have to eat crow.
See also: crow, eat

eat crow

To be forced to accept a humiliating defeat.
See also: crow, eat

eat humble pie

To be forced to apologize abjectly or admit one's faults in humiliating circumstances.
See also: eat, humble, pie

humble abode

A self-deprecating way to refer to one's home. Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice is the source: the insufferable Mr. Collins refers to his patroness Lady Catherine de Burgh with “The garden in which stands my humble abode is separated only by a lane from Rosings Park, her ladyship's residence'' and “But she is perfectly amiable, and often condescends to drive by my humble abode in her little phaeton and ponies.''
See also: abode, humble

humble pie

A meek admission of a mistake. The “humble pie” that we eat when we make a misjudgment or outright error was originally “umble” pie made from the intestines of other less appetizing animal parts. Servants and other lower-class people ate them, as opposed to better cuts. “Umble” became “humble” over the years until eating that pie came to mean expressing a very meek mea culpa. A similar phrase is “eat crow,” the bird being as unpalatable a dish as one's own words.
See also: humble, pie
References in periodicals archive ?
Christiane, an architect by training, spent many years studying the Moroccan craft of zellige, the ceramic mosaics that decorate fountains, private and public spaces and the walls and sometimes floors of houses, from the humblest to the most sumptuous.
What a shambles, in a city that had a proud record of outstanding libraries, from which people of all ages and classes from even the humblest of homes could borrow books.
He said Hazrat Ali (RA) was patient and always thankful before the Almighty, his bravery has not match and will never have a match till the end of the world, and he was the humblest of all the humble and was the gateway to the world of education.
From the humblest of beginnings, born in a Rochdale terrace to an unwed mother and growing up in the "hungry" 1930s, Smith climbed the ladder to the top of politics.
Mr San's relatives may take the humblest crumb of comfort from learning the killer is now back behind bars.
TEHRAN (FNA)- The people in the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK) commemorate the 3rd anniversary of the demise of leader Kim Jong Il in humblest reverence today.
He had been known as the "the world's humblest president" on the basis of his simple, austere lifestyle - he lives in a humble farmhouse and donates most of his salary to charity.
Rhoda finds a way to express her joy handling the rocks, while taking only a few of littlest rocks home, this delightful picturebook celebrating even the humblest components of the wilderness.
The 79-year-old President of Uruguay, Jose Mujica, is known as the world's humblest president due to his austere lifestyle.
The days were long and tough but I was in the humblest of surroundings with the greatest hospitality.
Beginning in the humblest of fashions, with a handful of local bands playing in a pub backroom to a small but enthusiastic crowd, the The Stockton Riverside Fringe Festival was born.
Gitanjali or the 'song offering', that got him the Nobel in 1913 showcased his "innermost feelings and the humblest prayers".
Everything that lives Is to be loved and respected, or we are no better than the Humblest insect we crush underfoot and take for granted, On this our earth we tread upon.
Gone are the 50 shades of gray and in has come a spectrum of color and design, which can be seen in everything from a Church of England royal wedding to the humblest Christening in one of our smaller churches," he continued.
Why should the government of Wales be denied that privilege when the humblest community council can levy a tax on its residents through the council tax precept?