huff

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go off in a huff

To leave in an angry, belligerent, or vexed manner. Don't go off in a huff like that, it was only a joke! Mary went off in a huff after her wife criticized her cooking.
See also: huff, off

huff and puff

1. To struggle or exert oneself physically. We huffed and puffed, but we did finally manage to get the couch up the steps.
2. To breathe very heavily or laboriously. Running to catch the bus has left me huffing and puffing. You really should quit smoking—look at how you're huffing and puffing after a single flight of stairs!
3. To make exaggerated, pointless threats. A: "Are we in trouble?" B: "No, just let him huff and puff until he's done—he'll forget all about it by tomorrow."
See also: and, huff, puff

in a huff

In an angry, belligerent, or vexed manner. Don't go off in a huff like that, it was only a joke! Mary went off in a huff after her wife criticized her cooking.
See also: huff

huff and puff

Fig. to breathe very hard; to pant as one exerts effort. John came up the stairs huffing and puffing. He huffed and puffed and finally got up the steep hill.
See also: and, huff, puff

*in a huff

Fig. in an angry or offended manner. (*Typically: be ~; get [into] ~.) He heard what we had to say, then left in a huff. She came in a huff and ordered us to bring her something to eat.
See also: huff

huff and puff

Make noisy, empty threats; bluster. For example, You can huff and puff about storm warnings all you like, but we'll believe it when we see it . This expression uses two words of 16th-century origin, huff, meaning "to emit puffs of breath in anger," and puff, meaning "to blow in short gusts," and figuratively, "to inflate" or "make conceited." They were combined in the familiar nursery tale, "The Three Little Pigs," where the wicked wolf warns, "I'll huff and I'll puff and I'll blow your house down"; rhyme has helped these idioms survive.
See also: and, huff, puff

in a huff

In an offended manner, angrily, as in When he left out her name, she stalked out in a huff. This idiom transfers huff in the sense of a gust of wind to a burst of anger. [Late 1600s] Also see in a snit.
See also: huff

in a huff

INFORMAL
COMMON If someone is in a huff, they are angry about something. He stormed off in a huff because he didn't win. He resigned from the firm in a huff when he didn't get promoted.
See also: huff

huff and puff

1 breathe heavily with exhaustion. 2 express your annoyance in an obvious or threatening way.
See also: and, huff, puff

ˌhuff and ˈpuff


1 breathe heavily while making a great physical effort: They huffed and puffed as they carried the sofa upstairs.
2 make it obvious that you are annoyed about something without doing anything to change the situation: After much huffing and puffing, he agreed to help.
See also: and, huff, puff

in a ˈhuff

(informal) in a bad mood, especially because somebody has annoyed or upset you: She went off in a huff.
See also: huff
References in periodicals archive ?
I applied for a job at Camp Robinson with Combined Support Maintenance Service, Huff recalled.
In preparation for deployment, Huff was stationed at Fort Sill, Oklahoma.
At the mobilization station, you do everything from A to Z, Huff said.
Huff retired earlier this year with more than 40 years of military service.
Huff is represented by the Fayetteville law firm of Everett Wales & Comstock.
So for the photos Huff took before 1978, "the law is going to favor Wal-Mart," Shipley predicted.
That depends, he said, on Huff being able to establish that her father-in-law and late husband were independent contractors, he said.
Cain draws on several classic texts in the course of his novel, one quite openly when he has Huff compare Phyllis to "what came aboard the ship to shoot dice for souls in the Rime of the Ancient Mariner" (Can you imagine a popular writer today assuming his audience would be familiar with this poem?
When Huff explains why he has committed murder, he uses a casino analogy.
As Sin had approached Lucifer, so Phyllis has been approaching Huff long before she shows up in the flesh.
Huff arranges the husband's murder so that it will seem he fell off the back of a train.
At last, Huff sees Phyllis without the filter of desire.