hose (someone or something) down

hose (someone or something) down

To use a hose to douse or clean someone or something. A noun or pronoun can be used in between "hose" and "down." The dog got all muddy on our walk, so I have to hose him down before we come inside. OK, you can start hosing down the car now.
See also: down, hose

hose down

1. To spray someone, something, or oneself all over with a hose, especially in order to clean them or it off. A noun or pronoun can be used between "hose" and "down." The kids were so covered in muck that we had to hose them down before they went into the house. Please hose down my truck if you're going to take it off-roading like that! I went over to the spigot and hosed myself down after digging in the garden all morning.
2. To put out or weaken a fire by spraying it with a hose. A noun or pronoun can be used between "hose" and "down." Firefighters arrived at the scene and began hosing down the fire.
3. By extension of definition 2, to attempt to control or mitigate a difficult, intense, or problematic situation. A noun or pronoun can be used between "hose" and "down." The PR department has been running damage control all week, trying to hose down the situation after news of the CEO's scandal broke.
See also: down, hose
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

hose someone or something down

to wash something down with water from a hose. Hose her down to cool her off and maybe she will do the same for you. Please hose down the driveway. Hose it down.
See also: down, hose

hose someone down

Sl. to kill someone. (Underworld. From the image of spraying someone with bullets.) Mr. Big told Sam to hose Wilbur down. The thugs tried to hose down the witness.
See also: down, hose
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

hose someone down

tv. to kill someone. (Underworld. From the image of spraying someone with bullets.) The thugs tried to hose down the witness.
See also: down, hose, someone
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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