horse opera


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horse opera

A film or theatrical production about the American West (i.e., a western), especially one that is clichéd or formulaic. My grandfather and I had a tradition of watching old horse operas every Sunday on TV.
See also: horse, opera

horse opera

n. a Western movie. (see also oater.) They’re showing a series of old horse operas at the theater tonight.
See also: horse, opera
References in periodicals archive ?
It is an easy recommendation for the contemporary adult reader who enjoys the Western horse opera style and feel.
On the other hand, Hollywood hasn't had a socko horse opera that would test the international waters.
Writer-directors Will Finn and John Sanford take an anthropomorphic approach to horse opera conventions, pitting bovine and equine white hats against two-legged bad guys.
The handsome, meticulously produced picture, which is accompanied by a plaintive musical score by Klaus Badelt, impresses for its rigorous recreation of the period and its refusal to turn the Kelly legend into horse opera.
Yet even as this rare foray into horse opera territory takes to heart the maxim of the late Western helmer Budd Boetticher -- "A man has a job to do, or a couple of men.
At every step, the filmmakers seem unable to pull off an exaggerated horse opera, and they never know when to pull the plug on scenes that are going nowhere.
Madden's also interested in helming the Miramax horse opera "St.
The production will feature longtime British stage heavyweight Sian Phillips as Dietrich, the screen star of such legendary pics as 1958's "Touch of Evil," 1948's "Foreign Affair," 1935's "The Devil Is a Woman" and the 1939 horse opera "Destry Rides Again.
Sean is one very headstrong guy, moping around in this horse opera looking to be in desperate need of a mint julep.
evil horse opera where good looks and good shots come together for the good of mankind.
Kevin Costner and Kevin Kline shine in the first of the former's horse operas.
In addition, the laconic storytelling yields an undercurrent of humor that one does not normally see in horse operas.
On top of this, TV networks in the '50s produced a glut of horse operas, filling their programming schedules with frontier tales of marshals ("Gunsmoke"), ranchers ("Bonanza"), gunslingers ("Have Gun, Will Travel"), and covered wagons ("Wagon Train").
Show business discovered the cowboy: Buffalo Bill's Wild West shows gave way to Tom Tix horse operas, and Mix himself gave way to cowboys Cooper and Wayne and Eastwood--and each new generation of audiences applauded and realized you didn't have to endure a sixmonth cattle drive to yearn for a hat, a pair of boots, and some jeans.
Then came a moment reminiscent of all those Hollywood horse operas where, to thunderous cheers, the US Cavalry rides in for a last-minute rescue.