horn in

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horn in

To intrude on someone or something. Please don't try to horn in on my phone conversations—they're none of your business.
See also: horn

horn in (on something)

Fig. to attempt to participate in something without invitation or consent. Are you trying to horn in on my conversation with Sally? I hope you are not trying to horn in on our party.
See also: horn

horn in

v.
To join without being invited; intrude: The new supervisor horned in on the discussion. We were talking privately when a coworker came over and horned in.
See also: horn
References in periodicals archive ?
DR: I did a little advertising in the middle years, but nothing works better than having people use your horns in an orchestra.
I picked up about five more valve sets from various places and produced about 25 horns in Los Angeles before moving to Norway in 1984.
The sheer size of horns in some species in relation to their body mass, attest in itself to the importance, however the material composition of horns make them relatively light.
A curious phenomenon is the presence of horns in the females of some antelope species and there is as yet no consensus about the function of these and also from an evolutionary perspective, what actually keeps them there.
In species where females have horns, the average length of the horns in females may equal that of males and in some species (e.
Owning over 45% market shares of automotive horns in India, this overseas acquisition is a major step in UNO MINDA's strategy to become a global player in automotive horns.
The reborn Premier League outfit go head-to-head with the Parrys International Wolves for the first time in more than 20 years when they lock horns in the first leg of the BBC WM Shield.
Scientists have recently discovered that beetles use their horns in surprising ways.
Cars, trucks and buses circle day and night loudly blowing their horns in solidarity.
Other researchers disagree, saying these herbivorous dinosaurs definitely used their horns in battle, both against large flesh-eating predators and against members of their own species.
SSO horns in 1950 (l-r): Doug Hanscombe, Clarence Mellor, Claude Katz, Alan Mann, Barry Tuckwell
SSO horns in 1972 (l-r): Bernard Hillman, Doug Trengove, Ed Lorensten, Clarence Mellor, Anthony Buddle, Vic Grieve