hormone therapy

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hormone therapy

A medical intervention in which hormones are used as a course of treatment for a particular illness. My grandmother is now undergoing hormone therapy for her cancer—I sure hope it works.
References in periodicals archive ?
When hormone production in the thyroid gland rises, the feedback effect causes the pituitary gland to produce less TSH and the situation returns to normal.
Of course we can't blame these actions on our hormones. Yet I feel it necessary to understand them when trying to work with clients who can't say no to chocolate, can't resist alcohol or simply can't get happy.
It turns out that this study found that the risks for cardiovascular and other problems depended on the kind of hormones the women took.
I suggest consulting with an experienced anti-aging doctor--such as those in the fellowship program of the American Academy of Anti-Aging--who knows how to test for hormones and interpret the results.
is a specialist in preventative medicine and hormone imbalance and serves as chief medical officer of BodyLogicMD a network of physicians specializing in bioidentical hormone therapy.
An understanding of how a particular hormone regulates reproductive activity requires knowledge of where the hormone is produced, where it acts, and what it does as well as insight into how the hormone is synthesized, secreted, transported, metabolized, and acts, on target tissues.
The natural hormones most commonly recommended for women at menopause are estriol and Tri-Est(rogen), natural progesterone, and DHEA.
It is possible that the first sex hormone hit the market around 1900: the androgen (male) hormone testosterone, extracted from bull testicles.
Constant stress floods the body with stress hormones, which can increase the risk of serious health problems.
Food and Drug Administration (FDA), in contrast to commercially produced hormone therapies which (as with all prescription drugs) must be tested before they are approved by the FDA.
Pharmaceutical companies, through aggressive and well-funded marketing strategies, have convinced doctors, health care professionals and, most importantly, women that hormone replacement is necessary if they expect to live long and healthy lives.
That's why the American Thyroid Association recommends measuring blood levels of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) in women every five years beginning at age 35.
"The Miracle of Bio-Identical Hormones: A Revolutionary Approach to Wellness for Men, Women and Children" is a comprehensive presentation explaining how hormone replacement therapy can restore lost health in ailments such as diabetes, fibromyalgia, ADHD, menstrual problems, migraine headaches, asthma, sexual problems, urinary incontinence, fertility issues, and others.
Human growth hormone has substantial risks and no functional benefits for healthy, elderly people, according to a comprehensive review.
Yet even on the far side of this healing adventure, it took me awhile to understand how hormone imbalance, the environment and our inner ecology are inextricably linked--and how I'd unwittingly contributed to my illness.