hook

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hook

1. tv. to cheat someone. Watch the clerk in that store. He might try to hook you.
2. tv. to steal something. Lefty hooked a couple of candy bars just for the hell of it.
3. tv. to addict someone (to something). (Not necessarily drugs.) The constant use of bicarb hooked him to the stuff.
4. n. the grade of C. I didn’t study at all and I still got a hook!
5. tv. to earn or pull the grade of C on something in school. History? I hooked it without any trouble.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Literature on a variety of species and fishing strategies provides evidence that catch rates with circle hooks can be maintained (but rates of deep hooking are reduced) when compared with catch rates with conventional J hooks (Cooke and Suski, 2004).
Participants decided that circle and J hooks with a gap width large enough that allowed space between the bait and hook for hooking fish but with a relatively low profile (by virtue of the gauge of hook wire) would be most appropriate for testing.
We examined rates and correlates of hooking up during students' initial transition to a residential college.
Our results suggest women and men new to college are likely to hook-up to the degree that they view sexual encounters as "no big deal" and to the degree that they perceive hooking up is common at the college.
New women students may therefore be surprised to find that hooking up may lead to negative judgments, unwanted sex, or both.
A major limitation of the present study involves the focus on potential negative consequences of hooking up, rather than potential benefits.
Though it is intuitive to assume attitudes (such as sexual permissiveness) are precursors to hooking up, such attitudes might also be a consequence of hooking up.
2003) and the association between perceived descriptive social norms and actual behavior, publicizing local rates of hooking up might provide corrective feedback.
The use of J hooks in natural baits resulted in incidences of internal hooking ranging from 19.
Although the frequency of internal hooking locations was significantly higher for blue marlin, white marlin, and sailfish caught on J hooks than on circle hooks, the rate of internal hooking locations for blue marlin caught on J hooks was less than half of the values observed for white marlin and sailfish.
In previous studies, internal or deep hooking locations have been associated with an increased incidence of trauma in istiophorids and other large pelagic fishes (Domeier et al.
The reduction in postrelease mortality of blue marlin caught on natural baits with J hooks relative to postrelease mortality of white marlin caught on the same terminal tackle parallels the reductions observed in the frequency of internal hooking locations and bleeding between these species.
In this study, the use of circle hooks in natural baits resulted in significantly reduced internal hooking and bleeding for blue marlin, white marlin, and sailfish.