hoodwink

(redirected from hoodwinks)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

hoodwink (someone)

To trick or con someone. "Hoodwink" originally meant to blindfold someone. If we don't get out of here now, Aunt Louise will hoodwink us into helping her set up for the dinner party. Mom, this guy's a total crook who's already hoodwinked people out of tons of money.
See also: hoodwink

hoodwink (someone) into (doing something)

To trick or con someone into doing something. "Hoodwink" originally meant to blindfold someone. If we don't get out of here now, Aunt Louise will hoodwink us into helping her set up for the dinner party.
See also: hoodwink

hoodwink (someone) out of (something)

To trick or con someone into doing something. "Hoodwink" originally meant to blindfold someone. Mom, this guy's a total crook who's already hoodwinked people out of tons of money.
See also: hoodwink, of, out
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

hoodwink someone into something

Fig. to deceive someone into doing something. She will try to hoodwink you into driving her to the airport. Watch out. You can't hoodwink me into doing that!
See also: hoodwink

hoodwink someone out of something

Fig. to get something away from someone by deception. Are you trying to hoodwink me out of my money? Max tried to hoodwink the old lady out of all her money.
See also: hoodwink, of, out
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
See also:
References in classic literature ?
You served me well enough, but you were easily hoodwinked, and our connection is at an end.
"I told him that what I wanted was his cob, and that it was no use his trying to hoodwink me by pretending he was one of my sort, because I knew very well that he was not; at which he shrugged again, and slowly dismounted, after offering me his money, of which I took half.
You remember how you escaped them by some ingenious stratagem; then you doubted if they were really deceived, or whether they were only pretending not to know your hiding-place; then you thought of another plan and hoodwinked them once again.
'You don't understand that what imposes on common folk would never hoodwink an editor.'
A good housewife is of necessity a humbug; and Cornelia's husband was hoodwinked, as Potiphar was--only in a different way.
Kitty, a fair but frozen maid, Kindled a flame I yet deplore, The hoodwink'd boy I called to aid, Though of his near approach afraid, So fatal to my suit before.