honour

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be honor-bound to (do something)

To be or feel obliged to do something because it is morally correct or required by one's sense of duty or integrity, even if one does not desire to do so. Primarily heard in US. It pains me to turn you in to the police, my friend, but I am honor-bound to inform them of your actions.

feel honor-bound to (do something)

To feel obliged to do something because it is morally correct or required by one's sense of duty or integrity, even if one does not desire to do so. Primarily heard in US. It pains me to turn you in to the police, my friend, but I feel honor-bound to inform them of your actions.
See also: feel

honours are even

Both sides are equally matched; the contest is equal or level; neither side has been victorious. Primarily heard in UK. Honours are even going into the third round of this match. At the end of an amazing game, honours are even between these two teams.
See also: even, honour

with honours even

With both sides being equally matched or level, as in a competition or contest; with neither side having been victorious. Primarily heard in UK. The two athletes are preparing to meet once again for a chance at the title, with honours even. An amazing match between two of the world's greatest football clubs has ended with honours even.
See also: even, honour

on (one's) honour

1. With utmost sincerity; with one's serious promise or oath. Primarily heard in UK, Australia. On my honour, I swear to you that I did not steal that money! If, on your honour, you promise to behave yourself, I'll let you go to the party with your friends.
2. With a sincere intent (to do something) without being watched or scrutinized; according to the honour system. Primarily heard in UK, Australia. To save on the cost of employing daytime staff to mind the till, we ask patrons on their honour to leave the correct payment for their items.
See also: honour, on

Scout's honour

An oath that one is being ingenuous or honest, or will uphold a promise or duty. Alludes to the oath taken by a member of the Scouting movement to be upstanding, trustworthy, and honest. Primarily heard in UK. I swear that I'll behave myself at your brother's wedding, Scout's honour! A: "Are you really telling me the truth about what happened to my car?" B: "Scout's honour!"
See also: honour

do the honors

To act as a host. Why don't you do the honors and greet people at the door? I'll take their coats.
See also: honor

be honor-bound

To be or feel obliged (to do something) because it is morally correct or required by one's sense of duty or integrity, even if one does not desire to do so. It pains me to turn you in to the police, my friend, but I am honor-bound to inform them of your actions.

do the honors

Act as a host or hostess, performing introductions and otherwise attending to guests. For example, At home Mary leaves it to Bill to do the honors when they have guests. This expression uses honors in the sense of "courtesy." [Mid-1600s]
See also: honor

do the honours

1 perform a social duty or small ceremony for others. 2 perform a particular function that is central to the proceedings. informal humorous
2 2007 David Kynaston A World to Build Two men were hanged at Pentonville, with the lugubrious Albert Pierrepoint doing the honours.
See also: honour

honours are even

there is equality in the contest. British
See also: even, honour

(in) honour bound

obliged by your sense of honour.
See also: bound, honour

roll of honour

1 a list of those who have died in battle. 2 a list of people whose deeds or achievements, typically in sport, are honoured.
See also: honour, of, roll

Scout's honour

used to indicate that you have the honourable standards associated with Scouts, and so will stand by a promise or tell the truth. informal
A Scout is a member of the Scout Association, an organization for boys founded in 1908 by Lord Baden-Powell with the aim of developing their character by training them in self-sufficiency and survival techniques in the outdoors.
See also: honour

be/feel duty/honour ˈbound to do something

(British English) (American English be/feel duty/honor ˈbound to do something) (formal) feel that you must do something because of your sense of moral duty: She felt honour bound to attend as she had promised to.Most people think that children are duty bound to look after their parents when they are old.

do somebody an ˈhonour

,

do somebody the ˈhonour (of doing something)

(formal) do something to make somebody feel very proud and pleased: Would you do me the honour of dining with me?
See also: honour, somebody

have the ˈhonour of something/of doing something

(formal) be given the opportunity to do something that makes you feel proud and happy: May I have the honour of the next dance?
See also: have, honour, of, something

(there is) honour among ˈthieves

(saying) used to say that even criminals have standards of behaviour that they respect
See also: among, honour, thief

in ˈhonour of somebody/something

,

in somebody’s/something’s ˈhonour

in order to show respect and admiration for somebody/something: a ceremony in honour of those killed in the explosionA banquet was held in her honour.

on your ˈhonour

(old-fashioned)
1 used to promise very seriously that you will do something or that something is true: I swear on my honour that I knew nothing about this.
2 be trusted to do something: You’re on your honour not to go into my room.
See also: honour, on

be/feel honoured (to do something)

feel proud and happy: I was honoured to have been mentioned in his speech.
See also: feel, honour

do the ˈhonours

(often humorous) perform a social duty or ceremony, such as pouring drinks, making a speech, etc: Harry, could you do the honours? Tom and Angela both want gin and tonic.His father was ill, so Charles did the honours with the welcome speech.
See also: honour

honours are ˈeven

(British English) no particular person, team, etc. is doing better than the others in a competition, an argument, etc: After a competitive first day of the series, I’d say honours are even.
See also: even, honour

a ˌpoint of ˈhonour

(British English) (American English a ˌpoint of ˈhonor) a thing that somebody considers to be very important for their honour or reputation: His refusal to talk to the press about his private life had always been a point of honour for him.
See also: honour, of, point

your, his, etc. ˌword of ˈhonour

(British English) (American English your, his, etc. ˌword of ˈhonor) used to refer to somebody’s sincere promise: He gave me his word of honour that he’d never drink again.
See also: honour, of, word
References in classic literature ?
The athlete's lips curled disdainfully, and without honouring his adversary with a formal denial, he exhibited, as if by accident, that peculiarly Russian object--an enormous fist, clenched, muscular, and covered with red hairs
My dear John,' replied Dot, turning very red, 'don't talk about honouring ME.
But her (Auge) he received and brought up well, and cherished in the palace, honouring her even as his own daughters.
replied the man, holding the door in his hand, and honouring the inquirer with a stare and a broad grin, 'Lord, no.
Then in this, I said, Homer shall be our teacher; and we too, at sacrifices and on the like occasions, will honour the brave according to the measure of their valour, whether men or women, with hymns and those other distinctions which we were mentioning; also with seats of precedence, and meats and full cups; and in honouring them, we shall be at the same time training them.
Oh, who could find the right prenomen and honouring name for such longing