homegirl

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homeboy

1. slang A friendly term of address for a male. What's up, homeboy? Hey homeboy, how're you doing?
2. slang A male friend or acquaintance, possibly from one's hometown. Teddy's my homeboy—he'll help us out.

homegirl

1. slang A friendly term of address for a female. What's up, homegirl? Hey homegirl, how're you doing?
2. slang A female friend or acquaintance, possibly from one's hometown. Erin's my homegirl—she'll help us out.

homeboy

and homegirl
n. a buddy; a pal. (Originally between blacks. Also a term of address. Homeboy is for males and homegirl is for females.) Come on, homeboy. Help out a friend. Tsup, homegirl?

homegirl

verb
References in periodicals archive ?
Mary Bucholtz (New York: Oxford University Press, 2004), 260-68; Marie "Keta" Miranda, Homegirls in the Public Sphere (Austin: University of Texas Press, 2003); and Amy Schalet, Geoffrey Hunt, and Karen Joe-Laidler, "Respectability and Autonomy: The Articulation and Meaning of Sexuality among the Girls in the Gang," Journal of Contemporary Ethnography 32, no.
Although these homegirls are a "heavy drug-using" group when compared with other groups of similar ages, these young women, as we describe in the following sections, have developed distinctive notions and boundaries about acceptable levels of use as well as methods for moderating problematic use and potential victimization while under the influence.
(1992), Going Down to the Barrio: Homeboys and Homegirls in Change.
Moore, Going Down to the Barrio: Homeboys and Homegirls in Change (1991) (examining the historical evolution of two Chicano gangs in the 20th century); Harper, supra note 4, at 49-52 (explaining the various masons that people join gangs).
"Coalition Politics: Turning the Century." In Homegirls: A Black Feminist Anthology, ed., Barbara Smith.
And Inksa was too much the longfaced watcher, the immigrant not in on the homegirls' jokes, not to be making a genuine effort.
But behind the antics of our favorite Brooklyn homegirls, or any of the other network families who bring another hilarious 30-minute crisis into our living rooms each week, is a dedicated crew of staff writers and producers.
Some of her later works are I've Been a Woman: New and Selected Poems (1978), Homegirls & Handgrenades (1984), and Under a Soprano Sky (1986).
I learned that in college from the writings of Adrienne Rich, Alice Walker, and June Jordan, from the crucial anthologies which gave me so many tools to go forward such as This Bridge Called My Back, But Some of Us Are Brave, and Homegirls. But remembrance is potent; once its force is unleashed and the status quo named fetid and stagnant, the rememberer is implicitly charged to move forward in that bright light which says, responsibility is yours now.
As proof, Anders offers her new film, Mi Vida Loca (due out this summer), which gives a voice to yet another segment of society usually ignored: the "homegirls" of L.A.'s Echo Park gang.
More than just an assemblage of Solange's homegirls dressed in white, the image succeeded in conveying the intimacy and strength of her squad, visually acknowledging the importance of each personality, role, and face.
I want my girls to read their Black Women's Bible, especially the gospel according to Aretha on R-E-S-P-E-C-T; the gospel according to Billie Holiday on God Blessing the Child who has her own; and the new epistles of self-love and respect from millennium homegirls like Lauryn Hill, Jill Scott, India Arie, Cassandra Wilson and Angie Stone.
A major part of the story involves Regina's homegirls (Puddin', Yvonne, and Tamika), who present challenges to Regina when issues like betrayal come into play, and it's intriguing to see how she reconciles what she used to be with who she has become.
Although Wounded addresses many of the same issues Sanchez raises in her previous collections--Homecoming, We a Baddddd People, Love Poems, A Blues Book for Blue Black Magical Women, I've Been a Woman, homegirls & handgrenades, and Under a Soprano Sky--in this new collection the author pushes the range of her creative talents by striking an impressive balance between awakening political consciousness and using her imagination to order or shape words and create sounds that represent the highest degree of poetic art.
They are complex divas and simple homegirls, hard and soft, all at the same time.