homegirl


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homeboy

and homegirl
n. a buddy; a pal. (Originally between blacks. Also a term of address. Homeboy is for males and homegirl is for females.) Come on, homeboy. Help out a friend. Tsup, homegirl?

homegirl

verb
References in periodicals archive ?
That's because Homegirl Cafe is more than just a place to get a taco: It's also where women who are former gang members or at risk of joining a gang can get job training and restaurant skills like cooking, barista experience, and even gardening.
He showed her the bakery and the Homegirl Cafe, where enemies work side by side with one another.
HOMEGIRL: Scottish Singer/songwriter Sandi Thom still keeps her Liverpool flat - and loves this city
In Bringing Down the House, Martin and Latifah are a classic screwball couple: he's the uptight lawyer who needs soul, and she's the funky homegirl who has been framed for a crime and needs him to clear her name.
When Alicia is injured, Marisa cuts school to visit her "homegirl" to give her "a meaningful hug" (p.
Its approximately 40 items included t-shirts with the Homeboy or Homegirl logo, children's and baby clothes, bags, mouse pads, wallets, hats, and coffee mugs.
Or was she pretending to be a homegirl with her pals as a joke as some people feel?
"I believe in the religion of love." And this sense of homegirl humor and serious social purpose lifted her performance to become a highlight of the evening.
HomeGirl Going Home: Hip-Hop Feminism and the Politics of Location.
Marisa was off to give her homegirl a meaningful hug.
More delightfully, he describes the members of the archetypal 1960s tough-girl group, the Ronettes, as "homegirl Jews." Well, one of them was married to record producer Phil Spector (who was not only born Jewish but, in what Buhle considers a "strange and definitely Jewish thing...never acted entirely without a degree of wounded artist's sensibility").
Not helping matters are one-note turns as Rebecca's trashy girlfriends by Kam Heskin and Carmen Electra, the latter playing a sadistic waxing technician with an affected homegirl accent.
Cheryl Rodriguez, "A Homegirl Goes Home" in Black Feminist Anthropology: Theory, Politics, Praxis, and Poetics edited by Irma McClaurin (New Brunswick: Rutgers University Press, 2001), 239.
The slices of life presented as the worlds of such youth as "Tiger," "Trust Me," "Homegirl," and "Jail-bail" are vivid, raw, and reportorial rather than dramatized.