hold out

(redirected from holdout)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Financial, Wikipedia.

hold out

1. verb To physically extend something to someone or something. Can you hold out a towel for me to dry my hands?
2. verb To refuse an offer or agreement, usually in order to wait for something else. I think they're lowballing me, so I plan to hold out for a better contract.
3. verb To remain in supply. How long do we think these drinks will hold out? Should I pour some more?
4. verb To maintain a defensive position. The police are going to breach this blockade eventually—we can't hold out forever.
5. verb To keep something from someone or something else, especially information or money. Someone needs to chip in three more bucks and I'll have enough to cover the bill. Who's holding out? Are you holding out on me? Do you know more details about the merger than you're letting on?
6. noun One who is opposed to an offer or agreement. In this usage, the phrase is often written as one word ("holdout"). We've still got some holdouts who are voting against this contract.
See also: hold, out

hold someone or something out (of something)

 and hold someone or something out
to set someone or something aside from the rest; to prevent someone or a group from participating. Her parents held her out of sports because of her health. They held out every player who had an injury.
See also: hold, out

hold something out (to someone)

to offer something to someone. I held a bouquet of roses out to her. I held out an offer of immunity from prosecution to her, but she would not cooperate.
See also: hold, out

hold out (for someone or something)

to strive to wait for someone or something. I will hold out for someone who can do the job better than the last person we interviewed. I want to hold out for a better offer.
See also: hold, out

hold out

(against someone or something) to continue one's defense against someone or something. We can hold out against them only a little while longer. Dave can hold out forever.
See also: hold, out

hold out

1. Extend, stretch forth; also, present or offer something. For example, He held out his hand and she took it, or The new policy held out promise of major changes in the welfare program. These usages date from the first half of the 1500s and of the 1600s respectively.
2. Last, continue to be in supply or service, as in The food is holding out nicely. [Late 1500s] Also see hold up, def. 4.
3. Continue to resist, as in The garrison held out for another month. [Second half of 1700s]
4. Withhold cooperation, agreement, or information, as in We've asked for a better deal, but they've been holding out for months. It is also put as hold out on, as in They were still holding out on some of the provisions, or He's not telling us what happened; he's holding out on us.
5. hold out for. Insist on obtaining, as in The union is still holding out for a better contract. [c. 1900]
See also: hold, out

hold out

v.
1. To present or proffer something as being attainable: I held a carrot out for the rabbit. The valet held out the keys for us.
2. To continue to be in supply or service; last: Our food held out during the blizzard.
3. To continue to resist: The defending garrison held out for a month.
4. To refuse to reach or satisfy an agreement: The union held out for three months without signing the contract.
See also: hold, out
References in periodicals archive ?
For starters, while it is not possible to measure precisely the economic and social costs of dealing with the holdouts, it is safe to say that they were substantial.
Legal experts did not anticipate that a ruling in the Hood County case would force Criner and the other holdouts to begin issuing same-sex marriage licenses.
33 billion plus interest to the holdout hedge funds, has called Argentina's payment illegal and rejected its argument that it has fullfilled its obligations.
Griesa's order says Argentina cannot pay exchange bondholders without also paying the holdouts at the same time under the pari passu, or equal treatment, clause in the original bond contract.
16) Third, it has resisted the litigation efforts of holdout creditors.
the right of holdout creditors of a restructuring of Argentinean bonds to
However, he concluded this was not possible given comments from Argentine officials, including President Cristina Kirchner, that Argentina would not pay anything to the holdout bondholders.
Hypothesis 1 was tested using the holdout sample of 20 failed and 20 non-failed firms.
Miceli's holdout theory does have some shortcomings of its own.
Strategic delay and holdout have also been studied in other contexts, including debt restructuring that requires acceptance of an exchange offer by multiple creditors (Brown 1989; Datta and Iskandar-Datta 1995; Hege 2003; Miller and Thomas 2006) and wage negotiations (Cramton and Tracy 1992; Gu and Kuhn 1998; van Ours 1999; Houba and Bolt 2000).
LAST APRIL two senators, Republican Revolution holdout Tom Coburn (R-Okla.
One holdout juror led to an 11-1 vote of guilt on three securities fraud counts against each defendant.
The lone holdout was American Council on Education President David Ward, who said he could not support the recommendations.
Our schools are the chief holdout against hardness in his drama, and here the usual culprits are at fault--the schools of education, the eminences in the field of education, the school bureaucracies, the unions.
Although the attempt to find new forest crops for Hawaii was a commercial flop, Hosmer's grove remains as a last holdout for many of the islands' increasingly endangered native birds, and it is still possible to see there such species as the apapane and the gorgeous i'iwi.