hold the stage

hold the stage

To be the dominant subject of attention in a particular arena. The phrase can be used both figuratively and literally, as when referring to a performance on an actual stage. Climate change currently holds the stage in global politics. The brilliant actress holds the stage with sublime confidence and skill.
See also: hold, stage

hold the stage

dominate a scene of action or forum of debate.
See also: hold, stage
References in periodicals archive ?
Mavin Record's proteges, Tiwa Savage, Johnny Drille and Reekado Banks as well as Tolani, Veentage Band and Kaline will hold the stage with musical performances before the screening.
Mr Norton added: "Watching him work is a privilege and there are very few acts that can hold the stage for as long as Ken does.
The first zone 'Batley Live' will hold the stage for the popular 'Batley's Got Talent' with performances from local artists.
In the absence of a top cast, however, this exercise in winking artifice does not really hold the stage. Nor were the visuals prepossessing.
He has proved to everyone he is a true star in his own right and he can certainly hold the stage on his own.
The band is littered with musicians who could hold the stage alone, yet it is our good fortune that they choose to perform together.
"Through that experience, I learned there was a special set of skills required for a dancer to be able to hold the stage alone." Later, as a leading dancer in Twyla Tharp's company, Whitener performed a thirteen-minute solo she had created to Brahms's Variations in A Minor on a Theme by Paganini for Piano.
His own plays, however, failed to hold the stage after the mid-18th century.