hold the fort


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hold (down) the fort

To maintain the proper functioning or order of some situation or place, typically during someone's absence. Don't worry, boss, I'll hold down the fort while you're away.
See also: fort, hold

hold the fort

Fig. to take care of a place while someone who is usually there is gone, such as a store or one's home. (From western movies.) I'm going next door to visit Mrs. Jones. You stay here and hold the fort. You should open the store at eight o'clock and hold the fort until I get there at ten.
See also: fort, hold

hold the fort

Assume responsibility, especially in another's absence; also, maintain a secure position. For example, Harry did a good job of holding the fort until his boss recovered, or Can you hold the fort in the kitchen? This expression has been traced to an order given by General William Tecumseh Sherman in 1864, which was repeated as "Hold the fort [against the enemy at Allatoona] at all costs, for I am coming."
See also: fort, hold

hold the fort

mainly BRITISH or

hold down the fort

AMERICAN
If you hold the fort for someone, you look after things for them while they are somewhere else. Her husband holds the fort at their Norfolk home during the week. You can hold down the fort here. I shouldn't be too long.
See also: fort, hold

hold the fort

take responsibility for a situation while someone is absent.
See also: fort, hold

hold the ˈfort

(British English) (American English hold down the ˈfort) (informal) be in charge or taking care of something while the person usually responsible is not there: I’m going abroad for a few weeks, and Kathy will hold the fort while I’m away.
See also: fort, hold

hold the fort

tv. to remain behind and take care of things. I left John there to hold the fort.
See also: fort, hold

hold the fort

Informal
1. To assume responsibility, especially in another's absence.
2. To maintain a secure position.
See also: fort, hold

hold the fort, to

To keep things going until further support arrives. The expression comes, as might be suspected, from a literal military order. It has been traced to one given by Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman in 1864, during the American Civil War, to Gen. John M. Corse at Allatoona. Corse was told to give up so as to avoid unnecessary bloodshed, but he refused, saying he had received an order from Sherman saying, “Hold the fort at all costs, for I am coming.” Records show that the actual words had been, “Hold out, relief is coming,” but fort is what caught on and was further popularized when it was made the refrain of a gospel song by Philip Paul Bliss.
See also: hold
References in periodicals archive ?
We just got to hold the fort until he gets healthy enough to comeback and play, added Ross.
The Russian, who arrived at Hearts in August, had a previously unsuccessful spell as assistant to Eduard Malofeev and is expected to hold the fort until the end of the season.
But DJ Chris, 31, partied so hard he rolled in half an hour late - leaving pals JK and JOEL to hold the fort until 7.30am.
"He has got in free transfers and loan players to hold the fort and he has done a fantastic job.
Having been away at the sales a lot recently I decided I had better hold the fort this weekend and allow Deirdre to go to Canada, where Zindabad runs in tomorrow's Canadian International.
Canning recently stood down for personal reasons leaving long-serving Forbes to hold the fort for the remaining games of the season.
He will also be given the chance to hold the fort until the summer of 2002 even if the Scots flop.
Ethan Hawke is the burnt-out, boozy sergeant who might find redemption if he can hold the fort long enough.
He will hold the fort while the club hunt a new manager with Paul Jewell and Gary Megson high on their wish list.