hokey

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hokey

1. Clearly contrived. "Hokey" comes from "hokum," which can refer either to nonsense or to trite and mawkish content in a creative work. That was such a hokey plot twist—it felt totally unearned.
2. Overly sentimental or trite. It's just some hokey romantic comedy—I understand if you don't want to see it.
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

hokey

(ˈhoki)
mod. contrived; phony; ill conceived. (see also hocus.) That’s a pretty hokey idea, but it may work.
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The Time of Our Singing is Powers's most compelling treatment of this theme, a generational narrative of a biracial family that is as well a deeply affective meditation on time, racial identity, and the complex engine of memory, big ideas that are here offered within a narrative of heartbreaking poignancy in which (without that forced sort of Forrest Gump hokiness) characters confront, even participate in the landmark moments of midcentury history, from Hiroshima to the L.A.
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With a touch of X Files, a smattering of The Omen and perhaps a little too much hokiness, it's all agreeably daft fun.
Parsifal's concern with the miraculous (and with magic) is allpervasive, in Klingsor's lair as well as in the weird subtlety of Wagner's retrospective meditation on his own successes and power (much as Yeats does it in "The Circus Animal's Desertion"), but the work also expresses a tinge of self-deflation best rendered in modern productions that employ some parody and a bit of deliberate hokiness in staging.
Rather than humor, she ends up mostly with hokiness (like the too-eager-to-please dog).
Pic slows a bit in final third, to allow for the inevitable touches of separation-and-reconciliation hokiness. Much to the credit of everyone involved, however, even the sentimental elements are presented with a well-tuned sense of the loony-toony playfulness.