hoist

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hoist by/with (one's) own petard

To be injured, ruined, or defeated by one's own action, device, or plot that was intended to harm another; to have fallen victim to one's own trap or schemes. (Note: "hoist" in this instance is the simple past-tense of the archaic form of the verb, "hoise.") I tried to get my boss fired by planting drugs on him, but I was hoist by my own petard when the police caught me with them beforehand.
See also: by, hoist, own, petard

hoist a/the white flag

To offer a sign of surrender or defeat; to yield or give in. After the prosecutors brought forward their newest evidence, the defendant hoisted the white flag and agreed to the plea bargain. We've been in negotiations for weeks, but it looks like the other company might finally be ready to hoist a white flag.
See also: flag, hoist, white

hoist the blue peter

To leave or prepare to leave. This nautical term refers to the blue and white flag that sailors would hoist before departing from a location. Hoist the blue peter, gentleman, so we can set sail!
See also: blue, hoist, peter

be hoist by (one's) own petard

To be injured, ruined, or defeated by one's own action, device, or plot that was intended to harm another; to have fallen victim to one's own trap or schemes. ("Hoist" in this instance is the simple past-tense of the archaic form of the verb, "hoise.") I tried to get my boss fired by planting drugs on him, but I was hoist by my own petard when the police caught me with them beforehand.
See also: by, hoist, own, petard

hoist a few

To have multiple alcoholic drinks. Nothing helps me unwind after a long week of working like hoisting a few with some good friends.
See also: few, hoist

fish something up out of something

 and fish something up
to pull or hoist something out of something, especially after searching or reaching for it. The old shopkeeper fished a huge pickle up out of the barrel. He fished up a huge pickle.
See also: fish, of, out, up

hoist with one's own petard

Fig. to be harmed or disadvantaged by an action of one's own which was meant to harm someone else. (From a line in Shakespeare's Hamlet.) She intended to murder her brother but was hoist with her own petard when she ate the poisoned food intended for him. The vandals were hoist with their own petard when they tried to make an emergency call from the pay phone they had broken.
See also: hoist, own, petard

Hoist your sail when the wind is fair.

Prov. Begin a project when circumstances are the most favorable. Don't ask your mother for permission now; she's in a bad mood. Hoist your sail when the wind is fair. Wait until the economy has stabilized before trying to start your own business. Hoist your sail when the wind is fair.
See also: fair, hoist, sail, wind

white flag, show the

Also, hang out or hoist the white flag . Surrender, yield, as in Our opponents held all the cards tonight, so we showed the white flag and left early. This expression alludes to the white flag indicating a surrender in battle, a custom apparently dating from Roman times and adopted as an international symbol of surrender or truce. [Late 1600s]
See also: show, white

hoist by your own petard

or

hoist with your own petard

FORMAL
If someone is hoist by their own petard or is hoist with their own petard, something they do to get an advantage or to harm someone else results in harm to themselves. You should stop spreading stories about your opponents or, sooner or later, you will be hoist with your own petard. Note: `Petards' were metal balls filled with gunpowder which were used to blow up walls or gates. The gunpowder was lit by a slow-burning fuse, but there was always a danger that the device would explode too soon and `hoist' the person lighting it, that is, blow them up in the air.
See also: by, hoist, own, petard

hoist with (or by) your own petard

have your plans to cause trouble for others backfire on you.
The phrase is from Shakespeare's Hamlet: ‘For 'tis the sport to have the enginer Hoist with his own petard’. In former times, a petard was a small bomb made of a metal or wooden box filled with explosive powder, while hoist here is the past participle of the dialect verb hoise , meaning ‘lift or remove’.
See also: hoist, own, petard

be hoist/hoisted by/with your own peˈtard

(British English) be caught in the trap that you were preparing for another personThis is from Shakespeare’s play Hamlet. A petard was a small bomb.
See also: by, hoist, own, petard

hoist one

tv. to have a drink. Let’s go out and hoist one sometime.
See also: hoist, one

be hoist with one's own petard

To be undone by one's own schemes.
See also: hoist, own, petard

hoist by your own petard

Hurt by your own misdeed. A petard was a medieval bomb made of a container of gunpowder with a fuse, and to blow open gates during sieges against towns and fortresses. Unreliable, petards often exploded prematurely and sent the person who lit the fuse aloft (the “hoist” image) in one or more pieces. The phrase, which is often misquoted as “hoist on one's own petard,” comes from Hamlet: For 'tis the sport to have the engineer Hoist with his own petard; and ‘t shall go hard But I will delve one yard below their mines And blow them at the moon . . .
See also: by, hoist, own, petard
References in periodicals archive ?
Specialist call systems have been built into each hoist, providing details of wind speeds, alerting the drivers which floors need servicing, and allowing the operators to communicate with the other hoists on site, eliminating the need to continually move the hoist up and down to find passengers.
The addition of Harrington below-the-hook products complement Hoists Direct's position as a leading distributor of Caldwell, Beta Max, Tractel and Columbus McKinnon below-the-hook lifting devices.
The Eurobloc VT2 electric wire rope hoist has been integrated with the new 360[degrees] power slewing jib crane, manufactured by Pelloby, the UK distributor of Verlinde.
The other side of the coin--keeping a hoist and its ancillary equipment in top operating shape--presents an opportunity to take advantage of a number of options, including inspection services from OEMs or third-party firms that can help reduce or eliminate potential mechanical problems.
According to the company, these new high speed hoists will allow its customers to support the construction of high rise commercial projects in their markets.
The dam's regulator, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, has ordered EWEB to replace the two remaining motor hoists due to the problems.
Increased versatility is also provided by the fact that these hook-suspended hoists can also be safely utilized for both horizontal and oblique pulling operations when required.
A PARAPLEGIC man died after he became trapped and suffocated in a hoist system designed to help him move around his home, an inquest heard yesterday.
A number of standards and specifications for chain lever hoists exist and each country will have its own legislation regarding the conducting of lifting operations.
The NPK NRE-1000 hoist features an automatic load limiter that prevents lifting of a weight that exceeds the hoist's load rating.
Two 18-foot diameter hoists are being built in Germany, "the biggest underground hoists outside South Africa," according to MacIsaac.
The partnership has also jointly funded hoists for disabled people in the changing rooms.
Other supply for the two hoists includes ABB controllers, operator stations, and advanced local and remote diagnostics and troubleshooting.
Hydraulic straddle hoists have long been a fixture in boatyards and marinas, where they raise craft from and lower them into the water for repair and launching.
On the west side of Sunshine Mine, the primary Jewell Shaft hoists were reconditioned and have been operational since April 2004 down to the 3,100 level.