hoist

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hoist by/with (one's) own petard

To be injured, ruined, or defeated by one's own action, device, or plot that was intended to harm another; to have fallen victim to one's own trap or schemes. (Note: "hoist" in this instance is the simple past-tense of the archaic form of the verb, "hoise.") I tried to get my boss fired by planting drugs on him, but I was hoist by my own petard when the police caught me with them beforehand.
See also: by, hoist, own, petard

hoist a/the white flag

To offer a sign of surrender or defeat; to yield or give in. After the prosecutors brought forward their newest evidence, the defendant hoisted the white flag and agreed to the plea bargain. We've been in negotiations for weeks, but it looks like the other company might finally be ready to hoist a white flag.
See also: flag, hoist, white

hoist the blue peter

To leave or prepare to leave. This nautical term refers to the blue and white flag that sailors would hoist before departing from a location. Hoist the blue peter, gentleman, so we can set sail!
See also: blue, hoist, peter

be hoist by (one's) own petard

To be injured, ruined, or defeated by one's own action, device, or plot that was intended to harm another; to have fallen victim to one's own trap or schemes. ("Hoist" in this instance is the simple past-tense of the archaic form of the verb, "hoise.") I tried to get my boss fired by planting drugs on him, but I was hoist by my own petard when the police caught me with them beforehand.
See also: by, hoist, own, petard

hoist a few

To have multiple alcoholic drinks. Nothing helps me unwind after a long week of working like hoisting a few with some good friends.
See also: few, hoist

fish something up out of something

 and fish something up
to pull or hoist something out of something, especially after searching or reaching for it. The old shopkeeper fished a huge pickle up out of the barrel. He fished up a huge pickle.
See also: fish, of, out, up

hoist with one's own petard

Fig. to be harmed or disadvantaged by an action of one's own which was meant to harm someone else. (From a line in Shakespeare's Hamlet.) She intended to murder her brother but was hoist with her own petard when she ate the poisoned food intended for him. The vandals were hoist with their own petard when they tried to make an emergency call from the pay phone they had broken.
See also: hoist, own, petard

Hoist your sail when the wind is fair.

Prov. Begin a project when circumstances are the most favorable. Don't ask your mother for permission now; she's in a bad mood. Hoist your sail when the wind is fair. Wait until the economy has stabilized before trying to start your own business. Hoist your sail when the wind is fair.
See also: fair, hoist, sail, wind

white flag, show the

Also, hang out or hoist the white flag . Surrender, yield, as in Our opponents held all the cards tonight, so we showed the white flag and left early. This expression alludes to the white flag indicating a surrender in battle, a custom apparently dating from Roman times and adopted as an international symbol of surrender or truce. [Late 1600s]
See also: show, white

hoist by your own petard

or

hoist with your own petard

FORMAL
If someone is hoist by their own petard or is hoist with their own petard, something they do to get an advantage or to harm someone else results in harm to themselves. You should stop spreading stories about your opponents or, sooner or later, you will be hoist with your own petard. Note: `Petards' were metal balls filled with gunpowder which were used to blow up walls or gates. The gunpowder was lit by a slow-burning fuse, but there was always a danger that the device would explode too soon and `hoist' the person lighting it, that is, blow them up in the air.
See also: by, hoist, own, petard

hoist with (or by) your own petard

have your plans to cause trouble for others backfire on you.
The phrase is from Shakespeare's Hamlet: ‘For 'tis the sport to have the enginer Hoist with his own petard’. In former times, a petard was a small bomb made of a metal or wooden box filled with explosive powder, while hoist here is the past participle of the dialect verb hoise , meaning ‘lift or remove’.
See also: hoist, own, petard

be hoist/hoisted by/with your own peˈtard

(British English) be caught in the trap that you were preparing for another personThis is from Shakespeare’s play Hamlet. A petard was a small bomb.
See also: by, hoist, own, petard

hoist one

tv. to have a drink. Let’s go out and hoist one sometime.
See also: hoist, one

be hoist with one's own petard

To be undone by one's own schemes.
See also: hoist, own, petard

hoist with one's own petard

Caught in one’s own trap, defeated by one’s own weapons. The term alludes to an ancient weapon, a thick iron canister filled with gunpowder, which was fastened to a gate or other barrier in order to breach it. It was a dangerous weapon, because the engineer who set it off could easily be blown up (“hoist”) when it detonated. Shakespeare was among the first to transfer the term, in Hamlet (3.4): “Let it work; for ’tis the sport to have the enginer hoist with his own petar.”
See also: hoist, own, petard

hoist by your own petard

Hurt by your own misdeed. A petard was a medieval bomb made of a container of gunpowder with a fuse, and to blow open gates during sieges against towns and fortresses. Unreliable, petards often exploded prematurely and sent the person who lit the fuse aloft (the “hoist” image) in one or more pieces. The phrase, which is often misquoted as “hoist on one's own petard,” comes from Hamlet: For 'tis the sport to have the engineer Hoist with his own petard; and ‘t shall go hard But I will delve one yard below their mines And blow them at the moon . . .
See also: by, hoist, own, petard
References in periodicals archive ?
Pneumatic hoists are low in weight compared with their electric counterparts, making them more mobile and far easier to handle.
Founded in 2002, Yorkshire Hoist has grown to become one of the North's largest suppliers, renting to the UK construction industry.
The addition of Harrington below-the-hook products complement Hoists Direct's position as a leading distributor of Caldwell, Beta Max, Tractel and Columbus McKinnon below-the-hook lifting devices.
The JDN hoists operate within an air pressure range of 4 or 6 bar, and when being used at the higher pressure rating a lift capacity of 2 tonnes per hoist is available, combined with a full load lift speed of 2.7 metres/min being achieved.
The other side of the coin--keeping a hoist and its ancillary equipment in top operating shape--presents an opportunity to take advantage of a number of options, including inspection services from OEMs or third-party firms that can help reduce or eliminate potential mechanical problems.
According to the company, these new high speed hoists will allow its customers to support the construction of high rise commercial projects in their markets.
The dam's regulator, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, has ordered EWEB to replace the two remaining motor hoists due to the problems.
The hoist lift chains provide a 3 meter raise/lower capacity as standard for variable load options of up to 3.2 or 6.4 metric tons respectively.
Michael Powell, 53, suffocated when he attempted to hoist himself over his bed in January 2008 and was unable to call for help.
Just as important as workbench design--and by far, the one aspect of mold repair most taken for granted--is the overhead hoist system.
Finnish lifting equipment maker Konecranes (HEL:KCR1V) said on Wednesday it had reached a definitive deal to sell the hoist distribution operations of its Japanese joint venture, MHS Konecranes, to hoisting machine and crane maker Kito (TYO:6409).
His brother Nicholas told the court that Mr Powell was fiercely independent and the hoists were installed in the bedroom and bathroom of his home by Newport Council in 2000.
Experience gained by the offshore subsea industry over the past five years has led to the publication by the International Marine Contractors Association (IMCA) of a revised version of "The Use of Chain Lever Hoists in the Offshore Subsea Environment."
Columbus McKinnon Corp, Amherst, NY Cramontec Inc, Cleveland OH Crane & Hoist Division Muskegon, MI Downs Crane & Hoist Co Inc Los Angeles, CA G W Becket Inc, Sharon, PA Harrington Hoists Inc, Manheim, PA Material Handling Inc, Green Springs, OH Pyrotek Inc, Spokane WA Quiptec Inc, Barrie ON Shepard Niles Inc, Montour Falls, NY Whiting Corp, Monee, IL Whiting Equipment Canada Inc, Wetland, ON
The Gemini Plus portable hoist, is equipped with a non-rotating cable to prevent loads from spinning while lifting and lowering.