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be hoist by (one's) own petard

To be injured, ruined, or defeated by one's own action, device, or plot that was intended to harm another; to have fallen victim to one's own trap or schemes. ("Hoist" in this instance is the past participle of the archaic form of the verb "hoise.") I tried to get my boss fired by planting drugs on him, but I was hoist by my own petard when the police caught me with them beforehand.
See also: by, hoist, own, petard

be hoist with (one's) own petard

To be injured, ruined, or defeated by one's own action, device, or plot that was intended to harm another; to have fallen victim to one's own trap or schemes. ("Hoist" in this instance is the past participle of the archaic form of the verb "hoise.") I tried to get my boss fired by planting drugs on him, but I was hoist with my own petard when the police caught me with them beforehand.
See also: hoist, own, petard

hoist a few

To have multiple alcoholic drinks. Nothing helps me unwind after a long week of working like hoisting a few with some good friends.
See also: few, hoist

hoist a/the white flag

To offer a sign of surrender or defeat; to yield or give in. After the prosecutors brought forward their newest evidence, the defendant hoisted the white flag and agreed to the plea bargain. We've been in negotiations for weeks, but it looks like the other company might finally be ready to hoist a white flag.
See also: flag, hoist, white

hoist by/with (one's) own petard

To be injured, ruined, or defeated by one's own action, device, or plot that was intended to harm another; to have fallen victim to one's own trap or schemes. ("Hoist" in this instance is the past participle of the archaic form of the verb "hoise.") I tried to get my boss fired by planting drugs on him, but I was hoist by my own petard when the police caught me with them beforehand.
See also: by, hoist, own, petard

hoist one

To have an alcoholic drink. Nothing helps me unwind after a long week of working like hoisting one with some good friends.
See also: hoist, one

hoist the blue peter

To leave or prepare to leave. This nautical term refers to the blue and white flag that sailors would hoist before departing from a location. Hoist the blue peter, gentleman, so we can set sail!
See also: blue, hoist, peter

hoist your sail when the wind is fair

proverb Take action when success seems most likely. I don't know why anyone would try to open a store in the middle of a recession. I mean, hoist your sail when the wind is fair, right?
See also: fair, hoist, sail, wind
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

fish something up out of something

 and fish something up
to pull or hoist something out of something, especially after searching or reaching for it. The old shopkeeper fished a huge pickle up out of the barrel. He fished up a huge pickle.
See also: fish, of, out, up

hoist with one's own petard

Fig. to be harmed or disadvantaged by an action of one's own which was meant to harm someone else. (From a line in Shakespeare's Hamlet.) She intended to murder her brother but was hoist with her own petard when she ate the poisoned food intended for him. The vandals were hoist with their own petard when they tried to make an emergency call from the pay phone they had broken.
See also: hoist, own, petard

Hoist your sail when the wind is fair.

Prov. Begin a project when circumstances are the most favorable. Don't ask your mother for permission now; she's in a bad mood. Hoist your sail when the wind is fair. Wait until the economy has stabilized before trying to start your own business. Hoist your sail when the wind is fair.
See also: fair, hoist, sail, wind
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

white flag, show the

Also, hang out or hoist the white flag . Surrender, yield, as in Our opponents held all the cards tonight, so we showed the white flag and left early. This expression alludes to the white flag indicating a surrender in battle, a custom apparently dating from Roman times and adopted as an international symbol of surrender or truce. [Late 1600s]
See also: show, white
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

hoist by your own petard

or

hoist with your own petard

FORMAL
If someone is hoist by their own petard or is hoist with their own petard, something they do to get an advantage or to harm someone else results in harm to themselves. You should stop spreading stories about your opponents or, sooner or later, you will be hoist with your own petard. Note: `Petards' were metal balls filled with gunpowder which were used to blow up walls or gates. The gunpowder was lit by a slow-burning fuse, but there was always a danger that the device would explode too soon and `hoist' the person lighting it, that is, blow them up in the air.
See also: by, hoist, own, petard
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

hoist with (or by) your own petard

have your plans to cause trouble for others backfire on you.
The phrase is from Shakespeare's Hamlet: ‘For 'tis the sport to have the enginer Hoist with his own petard’. In former times, a petard was a small bomb made of a metal or wooden box filled with explosive powder, while hoist here is the past participle of the dialect verb hoise , meaning ‘lift or remove’.
See also: hoist, own, petard
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

be hoist/hoisted by/with your own peˈtard

(British English) be caught in the trap that you were preparing for another personThis is from Shakespeare’s play Hamlet. A petard was a small bomb.
See also: by, hoist, own, petard
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

hoist one

tv. to have a drink. Let’s go out and hoist one sometime.
See also: hoist, one
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

be hoist with one's own petard

To be undone by one's own schemes.
See also: hoist, own, petard
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

hoist with one's own petard

Caught in one’s own trap, defeated by one’s own weapons. The term alludes to an ancient weapon, a thick iron canister filled with gunpowder, which was fastened to a gate or other barrier in order to breach it. It was a dangerous weapon, because the engineer who set it off could easily be blown up (“hoist”) when it detonated. Shakespeare was among the first to transfer the term, in Hamlet (3.4): “Let it work; for ’tis the sport to have the enginer hoist with his own petar.”
See also: hoist, own, petard
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer

hoist by your own petard

Hurt by your own misdeed. A petard was a medieval bomb made of a container of gunpowder with a fuse, and to blow open gates during sieges against towns and fortresses. Unreliable, petards often exploded prematurely and sent the person who lit the fuse aloft (the “hoist” image) in one or more pieces. The phrase, which is often misquoted as “hoist on one's own petard,” comes from Hamlet: For 'tis the sport to have the engineer Hoist with his own petard; and ‘t shall go hard But I will delve one yard below their mines And blow them at the moon . . .
See also: by, hoist, own, petard
Endangered Phrases by Steven D. Price Copyright © 2011 by Steven D. Price
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