hoist with one's own petard

hoist with one's own petard

Caught in one’s own trap, defeated by one’s own weapons. The term alludes to an ancient weapon, a thick iron canister filled with gunpowder, which was fastened to a gate or other barrier in order to breach it. It was a dangerous weapon, because the engineer who set it off could easily be blown up (“hoist”) when it detonated. Shakespeare was among the first to transfer the term, in Hamlet (3.4): “Let it work; for ’tis the sport to have the enginer hoist with his own petar.”
See also: hoist, own, petard
References in periodicals archive ?
It seems like a classic case of being hoist with one's own petard. Around 10 percent of federal and provincial legislators lied about their qualifications.
Hoist with one's own petard. This expression means to be damaged or destroyed by the very means one used to damage or destroy others.
* Traditional dictionaries don't always include allusions, phrases like yellow brick road, Typhoid Mary, hoist with one's own petard, and alpha male, which are seldom easy to find.