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a hard row to hoe

A particularly difficult or problematic task, situation, or set of circumstances to contend with or confront. Tax reform was one of the new president's primary campaign promises, but it will likely prove a hard row to hoe, given the deep divisions in congress. I know finishing this thesis will be a hard row to hoe, but I'm actually looking forward to the challenge.
See also: hard, hoe, row

a long row to hoe

A particularly difficult or problematic task, situation, or set of circumstances to contend with or confront. Immigration reform was one of the new president's primary campaign promises, but it will likely prove a long row to hoe, given the deep divisions in congress. I know finishing this thesis will be a long row to hoe, but I'm actually looking forward to the challenge.
See also: hoe, long, row

bros before hoes

slang A reminder, said by a male to his male friend(s), asserting that their friendship should be more important than relationships or interactions with females. Come on, man, don't ditch us for that girl you just met! Bros before hoes, bro!
See also: before, bro, hoe

hoe (one's) own row

To not interfere in someone else's affairs; to not pry or be nosy. Hoe your own row, will you? I can take care of my problems just fine. I really wish she would hoe her own row and stop asking me about my finances. So there I was, hoeing my own row, when the security guard comes over and starts asking me all kinds of questions.
See also: hoe, own, row

a tough row to hoe

A particularly difficult or problematic task, situation, or set of circumstances to contend with or confront. Immigration reform was one of the new president's primary campaign promises, but it will likely prove a tough row to hoe given the deep divisions in congress. I know finishing this thesis will be a tough row to hoe, but I'm actually looking forward to the challenge.
See also: hoe, row, tough
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

hoe one's own row

Rur. to mind one's own business. Tom: You're cutting up those carrots awful small. Jane: Hoe your own row! He didn't get involved in other people's fights. He just hoed his own row.
See also: hoe, own, row

tough row to hoe

 and hard row to hoe
Fig. a difficult task to carry out; a heavy set of burdens. It's a tough row to hoe, but hoe it you will. This is not an easy task. This is a hard row to hoe.
See also: hoe, row, tough
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

tough row to hoe

Also, hard row to hoe. A difficult course, hard work to accomplish, as in He knew he'd have a tough row to hoe by running against this popular incumbent. [First half of 1800s]
See also: hoe, row, tough
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

a hard row to hoe

or

a tough row to hoe

A hard row to hoe or a tough row to hoe is a situation which is very difficult to deal with. With four children under six and very little money, my mother had a hard row to hoe. In a criminal prosecution against the police, the prosecutor has a very tough row to hoe. She is the first to admit that being a woman in politics has been a hard row to hoe.
See also: hard, hoe, row
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

a hard (or tough) row to hoe

a difficult task.
Hoeing a row of plants is used here as a metaphor for very arduous work.
See also: hard, hoe, row
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

hoe

and ho
n. a prostitute; a whore. (Originally black. Streets.) Get them hoes outa here!

tough row to hoe

n. a difficult task to carry out; a heavy set of burdens. This is not an easy task. This is a tough row to hoe.
See also: hoe, row, tough
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

a tough row to hoe

Informal
A difficult situation to endure.
See also: hoe, row, tough
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

tough/hard/long row to hoe, a

A difficult course to follow; hard work to accomplish. This metaphor comes from nineteenth-century America, when most people lived in rural areas and cultivated at least some land. David Crockett used it in his Tour to the North and Down East (1835): “I never opposed Andrew Jackson for the sake of popularity. I knew it was a hard row to hoe; but I stood up to the rack.”
See also: hard, long, row, tough
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in periodicals archive ?
But the bad rap that hoeing has among many people comes from using the wrong hoe in the wrong way at the wrong time.
WITH an arrow-shaped sharp blade, this lightweight hoe has a long wooden handle with no grip so is suitable for all heights.
* Mortar mixer hoes feature plain or perforated blades and handles between 48" and 66".
Although commercial display holography has so far not lived up to expectations, set decades ago, investments from Google, Facebook, Microsoft and other 'technogiants' are bringing AR and VR technologies to the public eye, and HOEs as well as computation holography show true promise in a field that is overdue for success.
When X 17 addressed Kendall and Hailey as "hoes," the fans of the two did not like it and tagged Kylie Jenner to get her attention.
While you probably won't find the best wheel hoes or hand tools at your local hardware store, you can acquire them online.
Early hoes were fashioned of the finest materials available.
David Reed, 29, is accused of stabbing Peter Hoe to death after developing a fixation on fighting him and rivalling him as a local "strongman".
A farmer worked up a small area of soil with his hoe, dropped in seed and covered it with his foot.
There are all sorts of weird shaped hoes and cultivators for sale in the shops.
I make a variety of size hoes. I make the hoes from a piece of fiat iron strap by bending the strap into an "L" shape and fastening it to a handle such as a broomstick.
EACH OF THE HOES and cultivators pictured here does at least one job better than its all-purpose counterparts and is well worth the cost if you have a garden chore that calls for what it does best.
This was after Dickson had worked with Metrologic Instruments on further developments and scanning equipment using HOEs. At Holocaine Dickson continued to invent and develop HOE methods and applications.
Most of today's wheel hoes feature stirrup-style scuffle hoe blades that slice shallowly through the soil, killing weeds without pulling more seeds to the surface.
During the 1930s and 1940s, farmers were still thinning their cotton and chopping weeds and grass from rows with what was commonly known as the "hoe." Some hoes were goose necked or straight necked; some were heavy or light, with wide blades or narrow blades, and all got heavier as the day progressed.