hitch (one's) wagon to (someone or something)

(redirected from hitching his wagon to)

hitch (one's) wagon to (someone or something)

To attempt to benefit from something or someone else's success or potential by closely associating with it or them. Be careful about hitching your wagon to the senator—some say his seat is in jeopardy. Joe got lucky by hitching his wagon to that startup before it was bought.
See also: hitch, wagon

hitch your wagon to someone/something

If someone hitches their wagon to a successful person or thing, they try to use that person or thing to make themselves more successful. Jones isn't the only footballer to have hitched his wagon to brand promotion. They made a big mistake hitching their wagon to The Beatles. Note: You can also say that you hitch your wagon to a star or to someone's star, with the same meaning. Giammetti had the good fortune to hitch his wagon to a brilliant star. A powerful network had by now hitched their wagons to Johnson's star. Note: This is a quotation from the essay `Civilization' (1870) by the American writer Ralph Waldo Emerson: `Now that is the wisdom of a man, in every instance of his labor, to hitch his wagon to a star, and see his chore done by the gods themselves.'
References in periodicals archive ?
In "David Brent: Life on the Road," the first cinematic outing for the character established in beloved BBC TV mockumentary "The Office," Brent is hitching his wagon to infinitely cooler young talent Dorn (Doc Brown), a rapper who is everything he's not: modest, quietly confident, and great with an audience.
It's triple wedding bells over at the Vans camp with Johnny Layton marrying his beloved Drea Boo (baby on the way), Chris Pfanner tying the knot with his special lady (baby Max born awhile back), and Dustin Dollin hitching his wagon to the lovely Emelie (not expecting).
They said he's got enough problems already without hitching his wagon to her.