hitch

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Related to hitching: hitching post

get hitched

To get married. Did you hear? Bill and David got hitched last week!
See also: get, hitch

hitch (one's) wagon to (someone or something)

To attempt to benefit from something or someone else's success or potential by closely associating with it or them. Be careful about hitching your wagon to the senator—some say his seat is in jeopardy. Joe got lucky by hitching his wagon to that startup before it was bought.
See also: hitch, wagon

hitch (one's) horses together

obsolete To work or associate together amiably or for mutual benefit. The pronoun between "hitch" and "horses" is not always used. Considering the wealth and experience I could bring to your flourishing little enterprise, it strikes me that we would do well to hitch horses together. But it soon became clear that the couple do not hitch their horses together well at all.
See also: hitch, horse, together

hitch a ride

1. To hitchhike. (Done by putting one's hitch in the air in order to signal passing cars that one is looking for a ride.) I spent the summer hitching rides along the west coast. We didn't have any money for a taxi, so we had to hitch a life home.
2. To be driven to a location in someone else's car. A: "Do you need me to drive you to the movie?" B: "No, I'm hitching a ride with Janet."
See also: hitch, ride

hitch a lift

1. To hitchhike. (Done by putting one's hitch in the air in order to signal passing cars that one is looking for a ride.) I spent the summer hitching lifts along the west coast. We didn't have any money for a taxi, so we had to hitch a life home.
2. To be driven to a location in someone else's car. A: "Do you need me to drive you to the movie?" B: "No, I'm hitching a lift with Janet."
See also: hitch, lift

thumb a ride

To hitchhike. (Done by putting one's thumb in the air in order to signal passing cars that one is looking for a ride.) I spent the summer thumbing rides along the west coast. We didn't have any money for a taxi, so we had to thumb a life home.
See also: ride, thumb

thumb a lift

To hitchhike. (Done by putting one's thumb in the air in order to signal passing cars that one is looking for a ride.) I spent the summer thumbing lifts along the west coast. We didn't have any money for a taxi, so we had to thumb a life home.
See also: lift, thumb

hitch (one's) wagon to a star

To pursue grand or lofty goals for oneself, often by partnering with someone or something that is already successful or revered. You can do anything you want, so why not hitch your wagon to a star? When I was trying to become a screenwriter, I hitched my wagon to a star by befriending some popular actresses.
See also: hitch, star, wagon

hitch up

1. To pull something up, usually an article of clothing. A noun or pronoun can be used between "hitch" and "up." These pants must be too big now because I constantly have to hitch them up.
2. To connect or fasten something to something else. Who is going to hitch the rig up to the truck?
3. slang To get married. You guys better not elope and get hitched up without us!
See also: hitch, up

have a hitch in one's gitalong

Rur. to have a permanent or temporary limp. Pappy's got quite a hitch in his gitalong since he broke his hip.
See also: have, hitch

hitch someone or something (up) (to something)

to attach someone or something to something. Please hitch the horse up to the wagon, and let's get going. Please hitch up the horse.

Hitch your wagon to a star.

Prov. Always aspire to do great things.; Do not set pessimistic goals. (From Ralph Waldo Emerson's essay, "Civilization.") The speaker who delivered the high school commencement address challenged the graduating students to hitch their wagons to a star. Bob: What do you want to be when you grow up? Child: I used to want to be a great actor, but my dad told me hardly anybody gets to be an actor, so now I have to pick something else. Bob: Nonsense. If you want to be an actor, then do your best to be an actor. Hitch your wagon to a star!
See also: hitch, star, wagon

thumb a ride

 and hitch a ride
to get a ride from a passing motorist; to make a sign with one's thumb that indicates to passing drivers that one is asking for a ride. My car broke down on the highway, and I had to thumb a ride to get back to town. Sometimes it's dangerous to hitch a ride with a stranger.
See also: ride, thumb

without a hitch

Fig. with no problem(s). Everything went off without a hitch. We hoped the job would go off without a hitch.
See also: hitch, without

hitch a ride

Also, thumb a ride. Solicit a free ride, especially by hitchhiking. For example, I've no car; can I hitch a ride home with you? or He was hoping to thumb a ride to the stadium. The verb hitch here alludes to walking unevenly, presumably to hop into a car or truck; raising one's thumb is the traditional signal for stopping a car on the road. [First half of 1900s]
See also: hitch, ride

hitch one's wagon to a star

Aim high, as in Bill's hitching his wagon to a star-he plans to be a partner by age thirty. This metaphoric expression was invented by essayist Ralph Waldo Emerson in 1870.
See also: hitch, star, wagon

hitch your wagon to someone/something

If someone hitches their wagon to a successful person or thing, they try to use that person or thing to make themselves more successful. Jones isn't the only footballer to have hitched his wagon to brand promotion. They made a big mistake hitching their wagon to The Beatles. Note: You can also say that you hitch your wagon to a star or to someone's star, with the same meaning. Giammetti had the good fortune to hitch his wagon to a brilliant star. A powerful network had by now hitched their wagons to Johnson's star. Note: This is a quotation from the essay `Civilization' (1870) by the American writer Ralph Waldo Emerson: `Now that is the wisdom of a man, in every instance of his labor, to hitch his wagon to a star, and see his chore done by the gods themselves.'

hitch horses together

get on well together; act in harmony. US
See also: hitch, horse, together

hitch your wagon to a star

make use of powers higher than your own.
This phrase was used by the American philosopher and poet Ralph Waldo Emerson in 1870 in the context of idealistic aspiration; modern usage generally has the more cynical implication of attaching yourself to someone successful or famous in order to profit from the association.
1998 Spectator [ Francis Bacon ] was among the first to hitch his wagon to the star of the repulsive George VilliersJames I's next favourite.
See also: hitch, star, wagon

hitch your ˌwagon to a ˈstar

,

hitch your wagon to somebody/something

try to succeed by forming a relationship with somebody/something that is already successful: She quit the group and hitched her wagon to the dance band ‘Beats’.We must be careful. We don’t want to hitch our wagon to the wrong star.
Hitch means to tie or attach something to something else.
See also: hitch, star, wagon

get ˈhitched

(informal) get married: They got hitched last year without telling anybody about it.
See also: get, hitch

thumb/hitch a ˈlift

stand by the side of the road with your thumb out because you want a driver to stop and take you somewhere: We tried to hitch a lift, but nobody stopped to pick us up.
See also: hitch, lift, thumb

hitch up

v.
1. To pull up something, especially an item of clothing: I keep hitching up my pants because I forgot to wear a belt today. The pioneers hitched their pantlegs up and crossed the creek.
2. To attach something or someone to something or someone else with a hitch: I hitched up the trailer to the car. They hitched the horses up to the wagon.
3. Slang To marry: They hitched up last month in Las Vegas.
See also: hitch, up

hitched

mod. married. (Folksy.) Sam and Mary decided to get hitched.
See also: hitch

thumb a ride

tv. to beg a ride; to stand at the side of the street and signal to cars with one’s thumb for a ride; to hitchhike. I’ll thumb a ride to get there if I have to.
See also: ride, thumb

without a hitch

mod. with no problem(s). Everything went off without a hitch.
See also: hitch, without

hitch your wagon to a star

Set high goals. The phrase come from an 1862 Ralph Waldo Emerson essay “American Civilization”: “Now that is the wisdom of a man, in every instance of his labor, to hitch his wagon to a star, and see his chore done by the gods themselves. That is the way we are strong, by borrowing the might of the elements. The forces of steam, gravity, galvanism, light, magnets, wind, fire, serve us day by day, and cost us nothing.” It used to be heard among other bit of avuncular or graduation speech advice. Then advice for the future became more specific, like “plastics” in the movie The Graduate. Nowadays, in this economy, your guess is as good as mine.
See also: hitch, star, wagon
References in periodicals archive ?
Larry Hope, a former inmate at Limestone Prison in Alabama, was handcuffed to a hitching post on two occasions in 1995: first, after he was involved in an altercation with another inmate on a highway chain gang, and again four weeks later, after he had napped on the bus to the work site, was less than prompt in getting off the bus, and made vulgar remarks to and wrestled with a correctional officer.
The Court found that these violations of the Eighth Amendment were clearly established because a reasonable officer would have known that using a hitching post as Hope alleged was unlawful.
in this report, more than half (16 [59%1) of the reported rear rollovers involved improper hitching of a load.
The Hitching Post II, which is known for its blend of traditional and contemporary culinary styles, is also famous for its winery, featuring their Hitching Post Pinot Noir "Highliner.
Mr King - whose hair-raising hitching experiences including being picked up by a bunch of pot-smoking hippies in France and a boy racer tearing along country roads at 90mph on the way to Norwich - added: "I barely see them [hitchers].
In 1979 they made their first wine, a Santa Ynez Valley Merlot, crafted to pair with the wood-fired cuisine of Ostini's Hitching Post steak restaurant.
Sanford, who says he had no clue the glowing recommendation would turn up in the film, has seen thousands of new wine buffs making the trek two hours north of Los Angeles to dine at ``Sideways'' locations like the Hitching Post after sipping at some of the more than 60 wineries that dot the countryside.
For tickets and information regarding the Hitching Post party, the public can call: Lori Dinham at Direct Relief International, 805-964-4767, ext.
The Hitching Post is different from traditional airport hospitality settings.
They responded to me: You come up with a horse on opening day, and we'll put in a pretty little place with a hitching post,'' Frommer said.
The hitching poet is described in department regulations as a horizontal bar made of sturdy, nonflexible materials "placed at 57 inches and 45 inches from the ground so as to accommodate inmates of varying heights.
The five-course dinner will be prepared by chefs from Valentino in Santa Monica, the Hitching Post in Buellton and Leila's in Oak Park.
A prisoner who had been placed in a horizontal restraint device known as the hitching post" sued officials claiming violation of his Eighth Amendment rights.
In addition to hitching his mules to the wagons, Wright also saddles up and rides them.
The hitching post out back is gone and there are a few more stools in front, but everything else is still the same at The Munch Box.