hitch a lift

hitch a lift

1. To hitchhike. (Done by putting one's hitch in the air in order to signal passing cars that one is looking for a ride.) I spent the summer hitching lifts along the west coast. We didn't have any money for a taxi, so we had to hitch a life home.
2. To be driven to a location in someone else's car. A: "Do you need me to drive you to the movie?" B: "No, I'm hitching a lift with Janet."
See also: hitch, lift

thumb/hitch a ˈlift

stand by the side of the road with your thumb out because you want a driver to stop and take you somewhere: We tried to hitch a lift, but nobody stopped to pick us up.
See also: hitch, lift, thumb
References in periodicals archive ?
Shortie, up for Best UK Newcomer with Alexandra Burke, Jade Ewen and JLS, had to hitch a lift with cops after he was stranded in Edinburgh after a party.
He just loves to go walkies - especially if he can hitch a lift on Daisy the Shetland pony.
Every day we would walk for miles trying to hitch a lift, but no one would stop.
The OAP student's marathon trek to art college means getting up at 4am, then waiting by the road side with her thumb out, hoping to hitch a lift.
But emergency services say the men, both in their 20s, may have thought they were on the hard shoulder and were trying to hitch a lift when they were hit by a Volkswagen car.
David and Lesley Dunleavy were forced to hitch a lift home.
Her sister Kate said: "The only thing we can think of is that she was unable to get home and may have decided to hitch a lift.
Jo Jo went off to hitch a lift, and the witness went drinking with two men she had just met.