hire


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hired gun

1. A person who is hired to kill someone. Don't worry about that snitch. We've sent a couple of hired guns around to his house, so he won't be a problem for us much longer.
2. A person employed to provide armed protection for or fight on behalf of someone. Things have become so violent in the town that even the mayor has taken on some hired guns to keep him safe. The rebels brought in a few hired guns to help bolster their meager attack.
3. A person who is especially skilled at attaining power for others, such as a lobbyist or politician. The corporation has sent their best hired gun to convince the senator to vote against the environmental regulation bill.
4. A person hired to resolve difficult or complex problems or disputes, especially in business or law. Because of the intricacy of the legislation, the company brought in a hired gun to ensure the merger deal didn't hit any legal snags.
See also: gun, hire

for hire

Available for employment. I hear that Sasha's old tutor is available for hire—I think she would make a great addition to our teaching staff.
See also: hire

on hire

Available for employment. I hear that Sasha's old tutor is available on hire—I think she would make a great addition to our teaching staff.
See also: hire, on

hired muscle

One or more persons who have been paid to intimidate someone else (typically into doing something that will benefit the hired muscle's "boss"). I can't believe Jimmy sent some hired muscle after me—I was always going to pay him back, sheesh! Their so-called hired muscle is just one guy, and I'm bigger than him.
See also: hire, muscle

the laborer is worthy of his hire

Workers should or deserve to be paid. The phrase comes from the Bible. You did a fine job in the stables, Edgar. I have some money for you, as the laborer is worthy of his hire.
See also: hire, of, worthy

hire and fire

Employ and release from employment, usually in rapid succession. The department has started looking into the practices of businesses that hire and fire staff quickly enough that they never have to pay employment benefits. Your complaints have been duly noted, but the board of directors will have the final authority to hire and fire.
See also: and, fire, hire

ply for hire

To seek out or try to engage new customers. Said especially of taxi services. Primarily heard in UK. The city council has introduced new measures to crack down on the number of taxis allowed to stop outside of pubs and theatres plying for hire.
See also: hire, ply

hire out

1. To allow someone to use, employ, or access someone or something, in exchange for money. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "hire" and "out." My niece watches my kids all the time, so I've started hiring her out as a babysitter to other moms in the neighborhood. If we owned a second house, we could hire it out when we're not there.
2. To seek employment. Now that you have your degree, you can hire out as an accountant.
See also: hire, out

hired hand

One who is hired specifically to work on or help with something. Although often associated with farm work, the phrase can be used more broadly. With a few more hired hands, I think we could get this job done by the end of the week. I need a hired hand to help with the cows.
See also: hand, hire

hired man

A man who is hired specifically to work on or help with something. Although often associated with farm work, the phrase can be used more broadly. With a few more hired men, I think we could get this job done by the end of the week. I need a hired man to help with the cows.
See also: hire, man

hired girl

A girl or woman is hired specifically to work on or help with something. Although often associated with farm work, the phrase can be used more broadly. With a few more hired men, I think we could get this job done by the end of the week. I need a hired girl to help with the cows.
See also: girl, hire

not for hire

1. Not available to be used by someone else in exchange for money. Sorry, but the digital assets I've created are not for hire. Our military is not and never will be for hire by a foreign power.
2. Of a taxi, not available to pick up new customers. A: "Excuse me, could you take us to the airport, please?" B: "Sorry, I'm not for hire. Just waiting to pick up a customer."
See also: hire, not

hire someone away (from someone or something)

[for one] to get someone to quit working for some other employer and begin working for one. We hired Elaine away from her previous employer, and now she wants to go back. The new bank hired away all the tellers from the old bank.
See also: away, hire

hire someone or something out

to grant someone the use or efforts of someone or something for pay. I hired my son out as a lawn-care specialist. I hire out my son to mow lawns.
See also: hire, out

not for hire

[of a taxi] not available to take new passengers. The taxi was going to pick someone up at a nearby hotel and was not for hire. The taxi had a lighted sign that said it was not for hire.
See also: hire, not

hired gun

1. A person, especially a professional killer, employed to kill someone, as in They thought the murder had been done by a hired gun. The noun gun has been slang for a professional criminal since the mid-1800s.
2. A person with special knowledge or expertise who is employed to resolve a complex problem. For example, The legal team was looking for a hired gun to handle the antitrust angle of the case. [Slang; 1960s]
See also: gun, hire

hired hand

Also, hired man or girl . A person engaged to assist with farm or domestic chores, as in We need extra hired hands during the harvest, or She was looking for a hired girl to do the laundry. This use of hired dates from the 1200s and referred to someone employed for wages as opposed to a slave or serf. The use of girl now may be offensive.
See also: hand, hire

hire out

Obtain work; also, grant the services or temporary use of for a fee, as in He hired out as a cook, or They hired out the cottage for the summer. [Second half of 1700s]
See also: hire, out

hire and fire

engage and dismiss, especially as indicating a position of established authority over other employees.
1992 Martin Anderson Impostors in the Temple Usually the trustees, and they alone, hire and fire the president. They have fiduciary responsibility.
See also: and, fire, hire

ply for ˈhire/ˈtrade/ˈbusiness

(British English) look for customers, passengers, etc. in order to do business: There are plenty of taxis plying for hire outside the theatre.
See also: business, hire, ply, trade

hire out

v.
To grant the services of someone or the temporary use of something for a fee: The agency hires out temporary workers to local businesses. We hired out the cottage for the summer. My friends hired themselves out as cooks.
See also: hire, out

hired gun

n. a paid assassin. (Underworld.) The cops are holding a well-known hired gun until they can prepare charges.
See also: gun, hire
References in periodicals archive ?
Employers across the Middle East and North Africa (Mena) region have revealed their intention of hiring new employees, with 67 per cent of organisations in the UAE saying that they plan to hire within the next three months.
If you need to complain about a hackney carriage or a private hire driver contact Birmingham City Council's licensing team on 0121 303 9611 or email licensing@birmingham.gov.uk
* Make up an excuse for why you can't hire them now and postpone the decision.
A council spokesman said they believe the message was getting through to drivers that plying for hire is illegal and dangerous.
In fact, 50 per cent of employers claim that new hires at their companies were made within the past three months.
The hire fleet is available as a solution to that emergency or unexpected equipment breakdown, planned maintenance, plant shut down and as a temporary solution during peak demands to ensure essential processes still function correctly.
The event, in partnership with Birmingham Post and Mail publisher Trinity Mirror, is designed to educate, inform and raise awareness about the hire industry.
I think car hire companies should be fined for leaving such sensitive papers in their cars.
Regionally, in the next three months, the majority of companies (45 per cent) are looking to hire for less than five jobs, with 24 per cent are looking to fill between six and 10 new positions.
Researchers address the following questions: (1) Do the observable characteristics of teachers who are hired late and the schools that hire them differ from on-time hires?; (2) Does late hiring reduce student achievement?
CAR hire firm Europcar is launching car and van hire by the hour.
Of those surveyed, 60 percent said they expect to hire new employees in the next 12 months--a significant increase over 2010 when less than 37 percent of decision makers said they would hire.
A net 2% of chief financial officers (CFOs) interviewed for the Robert Half Financial Hiring Index said they plan to hire full-time accounting and finance professionals in the first quarter of 2011.
Department of Labor calculates that it costs one-third of a new hire's annual salary to replace him.