hindmost


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every man for himself

Each person must work independently toward their own success, as in competitive situations. The phrase is not only used to apply to men. Once we realized that there was only one scoop of ice cream left, it was every man for himself. Increasingly, it seems like it's every man for himself during election season.
See also: every, himself, man

every man for himself and the devil take the hindmost

Each person must work independently toward their own success, as in competitive situations. The phrase is not only used to apply to men. Once we realized that there was only one scoop of ice cream left, It was every man for himself and the devil take the hindmost.

the devil take the hindmost

Each person must work independently toward their own success, as in competitive situations. The phrase is sometimes preceded by "Every man for himself." Increasingly, it seems like it's the devil take the hindmost during election season.
See also: devil, hindmost, take

Every man for himself (and the devil take the hindmost),

 and Devil take the hindmost
Prov. Everyone has to fight for his or her own survival. (You can use this to describe an extremely competitive situation.) At first we tried to help each other study for the exam, but soon it was every man for himself, and the devil take the hindmost. The inventors tried to collaborate, agreeing to share the profits from their invention, but they grew so suspicious of each other that each began to work separately, and devil take the hindmost. When the ship began to sink, it was every man for himself.
See also: every, himself, man

devil take the hindmost, the

Let everyone put his or her own interest first, leaving the unfortunate to their fate. For example, I don't care if she makes it or not-the devil take the hindmost. This expression, first recorded in 1608, probably originated as an allusion to a children's game in which the last (coming "hindmost") is the loser, and came to mean utter selfishness.
See also: devil, take

every man for himself

Each individual puts his or her own interests foremost. For example, In this company no one helps anyone-it's every man for himself. In Chaucer's day this dictum was stated approvingly, meaning "if you don't look out for yourself, no one else will," but today such selfishness is usually censured. Despite the wording, the term applies to either sex.
See also: every, himself, man

the devil take the hindmost

OLD-FASHIONED
If you say the devil take the hindmost, you mean that you should do what is best for you, without considering anyone else. Just get your laughs any way you can and the devil take the hindmost. Note: The whole saying every man for himself and the devil take the hindmost is sometimes also used. We do not believe in the theory of every man for himself and the devil take the hindmost. Note: `Hindmost' is an old word meaning furthest back or last.
See also: devil, hindmost, take

every man for himself

everyone must take care of themselves and their own interests and safety.
This expression has been used since medieval times, but from the mid 16th century onwards it has often been expanded to every man for himself and the devil take the hindmost or, less commonly, every man for himself and God for us all .
1997 Daniel Quinn My Ishmael Tribes survive by sticking together at all costs, and when it's every man for himself, the tribe ceases to be a tribe.
See also: every, himself, man

(the) devil take the ˈhindmost

(saying) everyone should look after themselves and not care about others: I like the way people here always queue up. Back home we just push and shove, and the devil take the hindmost!
See also: devil, hindmost, take

the devil take the hindmost

Let each person follow self-interest, leaving others to fare as they may.
See also: devil, hindmost, take

devil take the hindmost, the

Too bad for whoever or whatever is last or left behind. The term comes, it is thought, from children’s games like tag, in which the person left behind is the loser. By the sixteenth century it had been transferred to out-and-out selfishness (“Every one for him selfe, and the divel for all,” John Florio, First Fruites, 1578). Beaumont and Fletcher wrote, “What if . . . they run all away, and cry the Devil take the hindmost?” (Philaster, 1608, 5.1).
See also: devil, take

every man for himself

Everyone looks out for his or her best interest. Originally this phrase expressed approval. It appeared in Chaucer’s The Knight’s Tale (“Ech man for him-self, ther is non other”), implying that if one did not look out for oneself no one else would. It was included in John Heywood’s 1546 proverb collection (“Praie and shifts eche one for himselfs, as he can, every man for himselfs, and God for us all”). This latter turn of phrase (with “God for all”) occurs with minor variations in numerous languages, including French, German, Dutch, Italian, and Spanish. Slightly later versions changed God to the devil (see also devil take the hindmost)—in print by 1574— and it is probably from this locution that the modern meaning of the cliché, describing not-so-admirable selfishness, is derived.
See also: every, himself, man
References in periodicals archive ?
One of Peterson's favorite reads is Edward Chancellor's 1999 book Devil Take the Hindmost: A History of Financial Speculation.
ECG was obtained by inserting three needle electrodes (MLA 1203), two in forefront limbs and one in right hindmost limb through epidermis to the depth of 1.5mm.
"Me first and the devil take the hindmost" suited a communist-trained bureaucrat as much as any disciple of Chicago School economics.
The hindmost needed some help from the others, but the vast majority of districts marched forward because they appreciated the payoffs involved for their children and for their property values.
Former IRB referee Spreadbury told Tait and Moriarty there will also be a clamp-down on ensuring players enter rucks and mauls from the hindmost foot - with as much focus placed on attackers as defenders.
As in America, the rich take care of their own, letting others take the hindmost, even though doing so contradicts the NPA's purpose - to help poorer areas, including Arab ones, not self-sufficient well-off communities.
Act 2: "Entr'acte," "Why Does She Love Me?," "Devil Take the Hindmost," "Heaven by the Sea (Reprise)," "Ladies ...
But when the rear of the Greeks was descending from the hills into the villages, being now overtaken by darkness (for, as the way was narrow, their ascent of the heights, and descent to the villages, had lasted the entire day), some of the Carduchi, collecting together, attacked the hindmost, and killed and wounded some of them with stones and arrows.
Women and children first, I don't think so, more like devil take the hindmost.
Scrum Introduction of an offside line fivemetres behind the hindmost feet of the scrum.
Dog eat dog and the devil take the hindmost. You're a fighter pilot, in a dogfight to the death over the Fields of Failure.
If China's intense interest in Africa served as the starting pistol in the new scramble for Africa, then the race is now well and truly engaged on a global level and the devil take the hindmost. Where once Africa went searching for investors, investment is now seeking out Africa.
For all his concern with preserving American individualism, for instance, Hoover was certain that we had "long since abandoned the laissez faire of the 18th century--the notion that it is 'every man for himself and the devil take the hindmost.'" Our national sensibilities were rapidly progressing beyond that faulty notion, he wrote in 1920, "steadily developing the ideals that constitute progressive individualism." Among the "glorious spiritual forces" growing within the American people "is a rising vision of service.