highbrow


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highbrow

1. adjective Of or pertaining to heightened intellectualism or superior learning or culture; especially erudite or sophisticated; appealing or suited to highbrows. The film is by no means highbrow, but it has an intelligent enough story and some compelling characters. After two degrees in literature, Stanley insists on reading only highbrow books.
2. noun A person who has or affects heightened intellectualism or superior learning or culture, often in a pretentious or elitist manner. Of course, a book like this won't be given the time of day by literary highbrows, but it nevertheless provides an engaging and—dare I say it—entertaining read.

highbrowed

Of or pertaining to heightened intellectualism or superior learning or culture; especially erudite or sophisticated; appealing or suited to highbrows. The film is by no means highbrowed, but it has an intelligent enough story and some compelling characters. After two degrees in literature, Stanley insists on reading only highbrowed books.
See also: highbrow

highbrow

1. n. an intellectual person; a person with refined tastes. (see also longhair.) The highbrows usually congregate in there.
2. mod. having to do with an intellectual or a person with refined tastes. Pete is sort of highbrow, but he’s an okay guy.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mukta Kumar Director Communications, Konnections said, "We are delighted to partner Highbrow as their communications consultants.
VENICE: Highbrow trumped Hollywood at the Venice film festival this year, with Russian director Alexander Sokurov's demanding German-language "Faust" taking top prize while Roman Polanski and George Clooney were overlooked.
Higher status people in the US today "enjoy many different kinds of culture, some prestigious and some popular, and delight in variety for its own sake" (Erickson 2008:343), dissolving the straightforward connection between high status and specifically highbrow cultural forms.
Shyon Baumann, a sociologist at the University of Toronto, traces this shift in Hollywood Highbrow, a swift, absorbing academic study of "the acceptance of Hollywood films as art among a large segment of the public, particularly (though not exclusively) those with postsecondary education.
One of the most down-to-earth females imaginable, the former 'Face of the Derby' appeared in a vast array of publications, with an entire news page of a supposedly highbrow daily devoted to a tumble she had taken during morning exercise in the build-up to the Cup.
The worry - from outside - was that the city was not highbrow enough.
GOOD EVENING, HAND TOOL DEVOTEES, WELCOME TO ANOTHER EXCEEDINGLY STUFFY EPISODE OF HIGHBROW HAND TOOL THEATRE.
Whether those merit the price of the book and all the highbrow verbiage that goes before, however, is an open question.
The crucial move in Cuddy-Keane's book is an uncoupling of the term highbrow from its associations with 'upper class'.
Williams' Keywords is a model here and this book puts the words democratic and highbrow in their full Woolfian cultural context.
Traders of these antiquities are really nothing more than highbrow fences, according to Atwood In some cases, the thieves act as agents for collectors seeking particular objects.
Ironically, though, one of the first negative critiques of Ulysses was not that it was too highbrow but that it was not highbrow enough.
For many years, staples of the highbrow American media diet have included NPR News and the New York Times.
Regardless of the practice's technical and theoretical competence, they have never adopted a highbrow architectural position.
It was the seminars that generated the highbrow discussions.