in high dudgeon

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in high dudgeon

With resentment; angrily or furiously. Typically refers to someone's reaction to an offense or a slight of some kind. The professor left the room in high dudgeon after the student continued to criticize his theory.
See also: high
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

in high dudgeon

Fig. feeling or exhibiting great resentment; taking great offense at something. (Often with leave.) After the rude remarks, the person who was insulted left in high dudgeon. Dennis strode from the room in high dudgeon, and we knew he would get his revenge eventually.
See also: high
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

in high dudgeon

Furiously, resentfully, as in He stormed out in high dudgeon. This term is the only surviving use of the word dudgeon, whose origin has been lost. [c. 1600]
See also: high
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

in high dudgeon

LITERARY
If someone is in high dudgeon, they are very angry about something. She had left in high dudgeon after learning that the only perk was free coffee. Washington businesses are in high dudgeon over the requirement that small businesses should insure their workers.
See also: high
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

in high dudgeon

in a state of deep resentment.
The origin of dudgeon in the sense of ‘ill humour’ is unknown, and it is almost always found in this phrase. However, other adjectives are sometimes used instead of high , for example deep or great .
1938 Zane Grey Raiders of the Spanish Peaks Neale left in high dudgeon to take his case to his court of appeal—his mother.
See also: high
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

in ˌhigh ˈdudgeon

(old-fashioned, written) in an angry or offended mood, and showing other people that you are angry: After being refused entry to the club, he went off in high dudgeon.
See also: high
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

in high dudgeon

Angrily, resentfully, in a huff. The origin of dudgeon has been lost and today the word is never used except with high—never alone and not even with low. In use from about 1600 on, the term was a cliché by the time explorer David Livingstone wrote “He went off in high dudgeon” (The Zambezi and Its Tributaries, 1865). The phrase may be dying out.
See also: high
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in periodicals archive ?
Justice Ginsburg didn't display high dudgeon very often as an advocate but I found one excellent example, and I cherish it.
Because the fans have never been told otherwise they believe Martin O'Neill departed in high dudgeon but of his own volition, yet now we learn he trousered several million as did messrs Houllier and McLeish who were sacked.
The Islamic Republic went into high dudgeon this week over NATO plans to deploy Patriot missile batteries in Turkey along the Syria border, accusing the West of plotting "world war."
Baritone Dean Elzinga sang Pizarro, though his voice was lacking the right projective resonance for the villain and he could not muster the kind of excess that's needed for a character that calls for much singing in high dudgeon.
There is no need to get into a moral high dudgeon over this.
Normally I am moved to high dudgeon by free apps that are Trojan horses
There is also an edge of passion to the writing, because the Kuba were and are at the centre of a literature of high dudgeon concerning the civilizing mission: its arrogance, hypocrisy and brutality.
What has the monarchy ever actually done for the country, someone asked in High Dudgeon (it's half a mile the other side of Low Dudgeon) and Kev diffused the situation with one of those facts of trivia that has most people scratching their heads.
"He was coming down in high dudgeon and was going to assault him and that was the intention of the two of them."
The Goodman fiasco (the unwelcomed visitors knew and cared nothing about Vancouver's Olympics) went viral on the internet but other than the CBC and Canadian Dimension's own Alert Radio interviews, and the high dudgeon of an outraged audience in Vancouver, there was little fallout.
Now in high dudgeon as he recalled listening to those remarks, and reaching an emotional climax that was clearly appreciated by the 1,200 or so RIAs who were attending the conference, the long-time president of TD Ameritrade Institutional wondered rhetorically why those CNBC anchors didn't call this executive on such a preposterous statement.
When Mallon complains that e-mail has "made the telegram's instant high dudgeon affordable to all," it is clear that the access troubles him as much as the dudgeon.
Curmudgeons in High Dudgeon: 101 Years of Invectives (1352-1453).
Another fine political year is upon us with seesaw races and fresh-baked dramas daily, high dudgeon, flights of fancy, tireless flesh-pressing, and thanks to the Web, you can feast on it anytime night or day, no need to sit by a TV and wait for the show to start.
David Lee Pennock was in high dudgeon after being turned away from Windermere House, in Langley Moor, when his father refused to see him, Durham Crown Court heard.
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