high


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high

1. noun An extreme or maximum level of something. The high this week will be 80 degrees.
2. noun A state of drug-induced euphoria or intoxication. This stuff will give you a nice, mellow high.
3. noun A state of euphoria or happiness (not induced by drugs, though sometimes likened to such a state). The thrill of seeing the ultra-rare bird was a high I'll never forget. The high of my book tour was soon replaced with the dread of having to start writing the next one.
4. noun A period of general excellence; a pinnacle. A lot of fans think that rock music was at its high in the late '60s. The highs of parenthood make the lows worth it.
5. adjective Describing someone experiencing a state of drug-induced intoxication or euphoria. We got high before the concert. Mom was furious when she found out we were high at the family reunion.

high, wide, and handsome

1. Very impressive. For such a young girl, the extent of her musical knowledge is high, wide, and handsome.
2. Very happy. Johnny's in a bit of a bad mood, but just give him a new toy to play with and he'll be high, wide, and handsome again in no time.
See also: and, handsome

wear (one's) apron high

euphemism To be pregnant. You two have only been married for a couple of months, I can't believe you're wearing your apron high already!
See also: apron, high, wear

high

1. mod. alcohol or drug intoxicated. They went out for the evening to get high, and for no other reason.
2. n. a state of euphoria caused by drugs or alcohol. His life is nothing but one high after another.

high

on/off the hog Slang
In a lavish or extravagant manner: lived high on the hog after getting his inheritance.
See:
References in periodicals archive ?
What makes the Julia Richman experiment so important is that the basic blueprint of the nation's high schools hasn't changed significantly since the rise of the "comprehensive" high school nearly a century ago.
Julia Richman opened as a comprehensive girls' high school in the 1920s, a five-story, red-brick structure that stretches from 67th to 68th streets on Manhattan's Upper East Side.
High schools essentially served as great sorting machines, preparing students very differently for very different roles in the workforce.
Yet high schools are moving away from preparing students for work.
It is often assumed that college plans make students more motivated, giving them reason to work hard in high school.
Fifty years ago, 60 percent of the jobs in this country were unskilled, meaning that dropouts or those with high school diplomas could perform them.
Students with a high school diploma can expect to earn less than 60 percent what a student with a college degree earns during the course of their working careers.
Of course, GED recipients include many older youth and adults who are unlikely to return to high school, even without the GED program.
Given that many states and the GED testing service consider a GED equivalent to a high-school degree, it wouldn't be surprising if many heads of household made the mistake of saying those with GEDs actually completed high school.
That's because larger screws generate high "tip speed," the speed at the tips of the screw flights.
"These mineral-rich formulations are difficult to run at very high speeds," says Robert Urtel, president of Century Extruders.
Nearly one in six of these high school athletes will be injured seriously enough for it be considered a time-loss injury (Stopka, 1988).
With only 10-20% of our high schools employing athletic trainers (Powell, 1987), most injuries are being managed by the coaching staffs, especially during practice.
Most people who have high total cholesterol also have high LDL, not HDL.
"A high LDL may be a prerequisite for coronary heart disease," says Basil Rifkind, a physician at the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute in Bethesda, Maryland.