here, there, and everywhere


Also found in: Acronyms.

here, there, and everywhere

All over; in every place. After our weekend at the beach, there's sand here, there, and everywhere. We're been here, there, and everywhere looking for the cat, but no luck yet.
See also: and, everywhere
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

here, there, and everywhere

Fig. everywhere; at all points. Fred searched here, there, and everywhere, frantically looking for the lost check. She did not rest until she had been here, there, and everywhere, shopping for just the right gift.
See also: and, everywhere
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

here, there, and everywhere

In every possible place. For example, Flags hung here, there, and everywhere, making it a colorful occasion. [Late 1500s]
See also: and, everywhere
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

ˌhere, there, and ˈeverywhere

in, to, or from many different places: The letters came from here, there, and everywhere.We searched here, there, and everywhere, but couldn’t find the document they wanted.
See also: and, everywhere
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

here, there, and everywhere

All over the place. This expression began in the thirteenth century as here and there, which we still use to describe something that is present but in no specific location. Christopher Marlowe appears to have been the first to use the longer form, in Doctor Faustus (ca. 1588): “If you turne me into any thing, let it be in the likelinesse of a little pretie frisking flea, that I may be here and there and euery where.” See also hither and thither.
See also: and, everywhere
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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