here's to somebody/something!

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Here's to

(someone or something), an expression used as a toast to someone or something to wish someone or something well. Here's to Jim and Mary! May they be very happy! Here's to your new job!

here's to

One salutes someone or something. For example, Here's to Bill on his retirement, or Here's to the new project. This phrase, nearly always used as a toast to someone or something, is a shortening of here's a health to and has been so used since the late 1500s. Shakespeare had it in Romeo and Juliet (5:3): "Here's to my Love."

here’s to somebody/something!

used for wishing somebody/something health, success, happiness, etc., especially when lifting your glass and drinking a toast to somebody/something: Here’s to the happy couple! May they have a long and happy marriage!What a wonderful meal. Here’s to the cook!Here’s to success!
See also: somebody
References in classic literature ?
She lent herself to immemorial human attitudes which we recognize by instinct as universal and true.
His person was now protected by immemorial and sacred usage, until the tribe in council had deliberated and determined on his fate.
They may love other individuals far better than their relatives,--they may even cherish dislike, or positive hatred, to the latter; but yet, in view of death, the strong prejudice of propinquity revives, and impels the testator to send down his estate in the line marked out by custom so immemorial that it looks like nature.
It had been her habit, from an almost immemorial date, to go about the country as a kind of voluntary nurse, and doing whatever miscellaneous good she might; taking upon herself, likewise, to give advice in all matters, especially those of the heart, by which means -- as a person of such propensities inevitably must -- she gained from many people the reverence due to an angel, but, I should imagine, was looked upon by others as an intruder and a nuisance.
Grace being said, -- for those people have their grace as well as we --though Queequeg told me that unlike us, who at such times look downwards to our platters, they, on the contrary, copying the ducks, glance upwards to the great Giver of all feasts --Grace, I say, being said, the High Priest opens the banquet by the immemorial ceremony of the island; that is, dipping his consecrated and consecrating fingers into the bowl before the blessed beverage circulates.
Immemorial to all his order, this investiture alone will adequately protect him, while employed in the peculiar functions of his office.
This is a great tract of a hundred thousand acres, which from time immemorial has been a hunting preserve of the nobility.
In vain the doors of the upper entry had been locked; the ghost either carried a duplicate key in its pocket, or availed itself of a ghost's immemorial privilege of coming through the keyhole, and promenaded as before, with a freedom that was alarming.
The servants said they would follow the fashion, a fashion grown sacred through immemorial observ- ance; they would scatter fresh rushes in all the rooms and halls, and then the evidence of the aristocratic visitation would be no longer visible.
According to the immemorial usage of waiters in all ages.
For Rosalind was no victim of the monster man, as you may have supposed her, no illustration of his immemorial perfidies.
I said secretly, because the Fairy had warned the Queen that the King was a magician; and as from time immemorial there had been a standing feud between the Fairies and the Wizards, he might not have approved of his wife's visit.
For my own part, I should doubtless have belonged to the latter class, had I received instruction from but one master, or had I never known the diversities of opinion that from time immemorial have prevailed among men of the greatest learning.
The Communists have no need to introduce community of women; it has existed almost from time immemorial.
In every Circular or Polygonal household it has been a habit from time immemorial -- and now has become a kind of instinct among the women of our higher classes -- that the mothers and daughters should constantly keep their eyes and mouths towards their husband and his male friends; and for a lady in a family of distinction to turn her back upon her husband would be regarded as a kind of portent, involving loss of STATUS.