nearest and dearest

(redirected from her nearest and dearest)

nearest and dearest

The people with whom one has the closest relationships; one's closest and move beloved family members and friends. People would much rather go home and spend time with their nearest and dearest, not hang around their co-workers at some dull office party.
See also: and, dear, near
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

nearest and dearest

One's closest and fondest friends, companions, or relatives, as in It's a small gathering-we're inviting only a dozen or so of our nearest and dearest. This rhyming expression has been used ironically since the late 1500s, as well as by Shakespeare in 1 Henry IV (3:2): "Why, Harry, do I tell thee of my foes, which art my nearest and dearest enemy?"
See also: and, dear, near
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

your nearest and dearest

Your nearest and dearest are your close friends and family. The English do not like to show their feelings, even to their nearest and dearest.
See also: and, dear, near
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

your nearest and dearest

your close friends and relatives.
See also: and, dear, near
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

your ˌnearest and ˈdearest

(informal, often humorous) your close family and friends: It must be difficult for him here, living so far away from his nearest and dearest.
See also: and, dear, near
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

nearest and dearest

One’s closest and fondest companions, friends, and/ or relatives. This expression, which no doubt owes its longevity to its rhyme, is often used ironically, and has been ever since the sixteenth century. Shakespeare so used it in Henry IV, Part 1 (3.2), when King Henry tells his son, Prince Hal, “Why, Harry, do I tell thee of my foes, which art my near’st and dearest enemy? Thou that art like enough . . . to fight against me under Percy’s pay.” So did Thomas Middleton in his comedy, Anything for a Quiet Life (5.1), produced in 1615. A contemporary context might have it, “We’re having an intimate gathering—for only a hundred of our nearest and dearest.”
See also: and, dear, near
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in periodicals archive ?
And, of course, Horrible Grandma will return to be increasingly horrible to her nearest and dearest.
The glowing young actress married filming manager Mohammed Ezz in a beautiful ceremony with the attendance of her nearest and dearest family members and celebrity friends in July.
So Kerrie was stunned when the film rolled to see it was Bryan with her nearest and dearest singing lines from Lou Reed's Perfect Day.
She tested her new perfume on her nearest and dearest in Liverpool before she gave the scent the go-ahead.
But to be guaranteed an audience with her - and prevent a multiple pile-up on the stairs of her two-bedroom tenement flat - members of her massive clan have her nearest and dearest, is reckoned to be the UK's greatest grandmother to make appointments to visit.
She joins the world-class trapeze troupe, the Flying Ciobanu, for the performance of her life, watched by her nearest and dearest with their fingers firmly crossed and their hearts in their mouths.
Cowgirl Karen Hall wanted her nearest and dearest around her for her last night of freedom ( all 53 of them.
Sources tell us the singer is giving her nearest and dearest diamond-encrusted stockings designed by herself.
MRS Merton And Malcolm (BBC1) took us into the home of TV's mostfamous pensioner and introduced us to her nearest and dearest.
Ireland's latest Lotto millionaire last night made it a family affair - by sharing her winnings with her nearest and dearest.